Jump to content


Photo

Unfriendly me?


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 BlackMatta

BlackMatta

    Family

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1091 posts

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    Nigerian

Posted 29 June 2007 - 09:39 PM

Ker-hem ***nervous clearing of throat***

The following thing happened and I would like people's opinion on it and how they think they would have reacted.

I was returning from work and I passed an African girl who was standing outside a newsagent's on the other side of the road.

Now this girl looked...how shall we put it... CULTURALLY ASSIMILATED. Standing there with her DOG and some other effects she felt somehow ALIEN to me. I cannot explain it, exactly. Her appearance and behaviour was so English. Maybe the dog wasn't even hers. But she seemed too disconnected with her roots. Sort of TOTALLY ASSIMILATED and happy with it.

The thing was, as I passed, she gave me a friendly smile (albeit a lil too reminiscent of the plastic English ting).

I wouldn't say I whisked on by without a smile, but it must have come across that way since I didn't respond and I didn't give her a second glance. It doesn't seem very nice but it really was my honest reaction. I had nothing against her. It's just that she came across as a TOTAL stranger in a way that a culturally aware African would not. So I did what I do with strangers - continue on my way.

What's your comment on this. Would you make allowances in such a circumstance for cultural things you do not like?
Wisdom, not power.

#2 Tafari Shabazz

Tafari Shabazz

    Family

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 997 posts
  • Gender:Male

  • Are you African: Y

Posted 30 June 2007 - 05:03 PM

QUOTE
What's your comment on this. Would you make allowances in such a circumstance for cultural things you do not like?


Well its best never to judge anyone on appearances! I mean I don't ever see sistas everyday wearing Kente, walking lions, and sporting Afros, so I mean its always good to be open and welcoming to brothas and sistas.

I also own a dog (technically its my cousins)! Ok, its mostly in the yard and I never let it near my face, or into the house, but it doesn't mean i'm "English"

#3 Voo

Voo

    Ligali Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1306 posts
  • Location:London
  • Interests:History, politics, literature, music, language, culture, people, progression and revolution...

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    Parents were born in Grenada

Posted 02 July 2007 - 11:55 AM

It's a difficult one.

I generally tend to smile at most Africans if they look my way. Generally get a good response.

I don't, however, smile at Africans with european partners or those 'Brit Boys' (i.e. goes dan the pub with his mates for a beeer, watches footie non-stop and reads FHM). Bearing that in mind, I don't know if I would have smiled at the sista you described but if she smiled at me first, I would definitely smile back.
"To kill a woman is to kill humanity itself"

#4 Mogho Naaba

Mogho Naaba

    Family

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3233 posts

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    Afrikan by way of the Native Indian homelands

Posted 02 July 2007 - 02:40 PM

LOL @ "dan the pub for a beeer".

I would have smiled myself, but if captain caveman came out the newsagent and put his narsty arms round her I would just kiss my teeth in disgust and walk on by.

#5 Gazelle

Gazelle

    Family

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 904 posts

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    BUQ

Posted 03 July 2007 - 07:54 PM

BM:

What does a culturally aware African look like?


#6 BlackMatta

BlackMatta

    Family

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1091 posts

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    Nigerian

Posted 03 July 2007 - 08:32 PM

QUOTE (Gazelle @ Jul 3 2007, 08:54 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
BM:

What does a culturally aware African look like?


Aware. Culturally.
Wisdom, not power.

#7 Gazelle

Gazelle

    Family

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 904 posts

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    BUQ

Posted 03 July 2007 - 08:48 PM

Stop it! Just answer the question, you unfriendly person! mad.gif

#8 BlackMatta

BlackMatta

    Family

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1091 posts

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    Nigerian

Posted 03 July 2007 - 09:17 PM

QUOTE (Gazelle @ Jul 3 2007, 09:48 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Stop it! Just answer the question, you unfriendly person! mad.gif


All I can suggest is that you go mix among some culturally aware people and some lost souls.

If you keep your wits about you, that should give you a flavour of things.
Wisdom, not power.

#9 The Freelance Scientist

The Freelance Scientist

    Family

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2358 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Gambia
  • Interests:Education, Politics, Current Affairs, Dialogue with the community and others.

    I like going to the gym, playing football and travelling the world. I'm at university at the moment.

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    Mandinka

Posted 08 July 2007 - 01:51 PM

QUOTE (BlackMatta @ Jun 29 2007, 10:39 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Ker-hem ***nervous clearing of throat***

The following thing happened and I would like people's opinion on it and how they think they would have reacted.

I was returning from work and I passed an African girl who was standing outside a newsagent's on the other side of the road.

Now this girl looked...how shall we put it... CULTURALLY ASSIMILATED. Standing there with her DOG and some other effects she felt somehow ALIEN to me. I cannot explain it, exactly. Her appearance and behaviour was so English. Maybe the dog wasn't even hers. But she seemed too disconnected with her roots. Sort of TOTALLY ASSIMILATED and happy with it.

The thing was, as I passed, she gave me a friendly smile (albeit a lil too reminiscent of the plastic English ting).

I wouldn't say I whisked on by without a smile, but it must have come across that way since I didn't respond and I didn't give her a second glance. It doesn't seem very nice but it really was my honest reaction. I had nothing against her. It's just that she came across as a TOTAL stranger in a way that a culturally aware African would not. So I did what I do with strangers - continue on my way.

What's your comment on this. Would you make allowances in such a circumstance for cultural things you do not like?



Your response was normal, given the circumstances. I would've done the same thing. blink.gif
[i]The Freelance Scientist: He Is The Eternal Student.

#10 Timeline

Timeline

    Loyal Contributor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 608 posts

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    unsure

Posted 11 July 2007 - 10:31 PM

I feel that way about some people who share my skin color, but not my soul. I especially hate staunch african american capitalists. I'll name a few:


Condoleeza Rice: I'm still convinced that she is some old white racist male in disguise.

Clarence Thomas: His identity is completely wrapped up in a white society that will discard him quicker than he can say the word "Token" when he starts exhibiting his own opinions.


and fakes......


Nikki Giovanni: She is simply a blind revolutionary who will fight to the death for anything black because it is her "thing" to do. Biggest hypocrite I've ever known. The woman runs and gets a Tupac tatoo so that she can have "street creds" and supports gangster rapper Tupac completely, yet she won't allow a troubled asian kid by the name of Cho Seung-hui to write violent poetry in her class.

Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson: They have become the spokespersons for african american issues. Everytime something having to do with blacks comes up, they automatically turn on and start spouting their tired shit to whites. These men are so disconnected from black life and so connected to their own fame, that they seriously don't know the difference anymore between racism and a paycheck. So that everytime something can be construed as "racist" they see dollar signs.

and the strangers that happen to look like me in daily life...........

Most people who I can't recognize on a spiritual level get the cold shoulder from me. I could have spent a few weeks engaging them in meaningless small talk because that seems to be the only form of communication they feel comfortable with, but once I know for sure that there is no spiritual connection, no deep understanding, then I avoid even small talk. Staunch black capitalists that I meet in daily life have money on their mind all the time, and can't resist comparing themselves, financially to everyone else, in order to gauge their own worth. And the fakes fight for everything having to do with africans, except it is more like a habit, an automated system that turns on everytime the words "african" "african american" "black" come up. They have made a career out of fighting an abstract cause that they have lost touch with.

#11 Voo

Voo

    Ligali Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1306 posts
  • Location:London
  • Interests:History, politics, literature, music, language, culture, people, progression and revolution...

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    Parents were born in Grenada

Posted 12 July 2007 - 09:26 AM

QUOTE (Timeline @ Jul 11 2007, 10:31 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Condoleeza Rice: I'm still convinced that she is some old white racist male in disguise.


Why you hatin' on Condi! Give the sista a break! She's representing for all us African women who didn't have the conviction, opportunity and cold hearted determination to get where she is. What's wrong with people these days, an African women makes it to the top and we all have to beat her up for it...


... I'm kidding by the way! wink.gif
"To kill a woman is to kill humanity itself"

#12 BlackMatta

BlackMatta

    Family

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1091 posts

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    Nigerian

Posted 12 July 2007 - 05:26 PM

Thanks everyone.

An interesting range of opinion.
Wisdom, not power.

#13 Ma-at Mama

Ma-at Mama

    Advanced Contributor

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 159 posts
  • Interests:Music, politics, poetry, good company, mind sex

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    Caribbean

Posted 12 July 2007 - 11:37 PM

Take people as you find them. It works for me. I would have smiled back, or maybe nodded my head in response to her hello,; I would have thought it rude not to. But that would have been about it. I would have then gone merrily on my way.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users