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#21 InCharge

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Posted 25 November 2005 - 11:40 AM

@Sankofa

Is your steadfast support for this man down to the fact that you are both from the same country?
http://www.trinicenter.com/

#22 Sankofa

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Posted 25 November 2005 - 11:57 AM

QUOTE (InCharge @ Nov 25 2005, 11:40 AM)
@Sankofa 

  Is your steadfast support for this man down to the fact that you are both from the same country?

Elaborate a bit more.......

nope he was the first (most high profile) fashion designer that came to mind, when thinking of a way involve the community in investing in their fellow Africans.

I love for you and others to add a list of many african designers and fashion ppl lol. Its just my ignorance to whats happening in the fashion industry......

Edited by Sankofa, 25 November 2005 - 12:01 PM.


#23 Mezmerized

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Posted 27 November 2005 - 06:09 PM

Sankofa, no offence bro but please, just because someone is African it doesn't mean its automatic that we support them. They must show us the community that they are working not just to elevate themselves but also Africans on the whole. And by far, Mr Boateng has shown that he is a little Britain coconut who has been drinking from the wells of the oppressors. He has never indicated anything otherwise. In fact he is so WHITE that years ago i thought he was GAY!

And personaly, the only African i am willing to support is the ones who are not working with european to turn us into european style loving buffons.

Most of the African disigners in the west are white loving morrons who's clothes deserve to be worn only by Essex Chavs......Boateng is too shamefull.....in fact its been years since i actually thought of him as African........i think something fishy is going on with some young Ghanians men and their love of white p****s.... unsure.gif

#24 Sankofa

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Posted 28 November 2005 - 10:56 AM

QUOTE (Mezmerized @ Nov 27 2005, 06:09 PM)
They must show us the community that they are working not just to elevate themselves but also Africans on the whole.

This is what i am saying. As for Boateng, i am not that bothered, thats why i suggested people add, other designer, just to increase their general exposure

#25 Mogho Naaba

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Posted 28 November 2005 - 02:43 PM

lol

#26 Sankofa

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Posted 29 November 2005 - 12:55 PM

QUOTE (PRINCE HAKEEM @ Nov 28 2005, 02:43 PM)
lol

yep.

#27 MarcusGarveyLives

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Posted 01 January 2006 - 04:42 PM



Queen Elizabeth has just given him an OBE

#28 akin

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Posted 01 January 2006 - 06:27 PM

Damn MGL,

You just killed it right there, LOL.

#29 Sankofa

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Posted 01 January 2006 - 06:35 PM

@MGL
i expecting someone to post this info (about the OBE)....LOL

#30 Gazelle

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Posted 28 January 2006 - 07:10 PM

Sankofa bor, I do not think Ozwald is going to be embracing Africans, specifically Ghana anytime soon, read this:

Boateng: British tailor to the stars
By Suzy Menkes International Herald Tribune

MONDAY, JANUARY 9, 2006


LONDON On Thursday, Ozwald Boateng will fly to Los Angeles for the day to stand beside Robert Redford and talk about his life as a British tailor for a documentary that will air on Redford's Sundance television channel in September.

That is after Boateng has finished replying to the flood of letters congratulating him on receiving an Order of the British Empire from Queen Elizabeth - and just three days before his Milan show and two weeks before the Paris presentation of his line for Givenchy.

Boateng, 38, who has just returned from vacation with his wife, Guynel, and their two children, is taking it all in the lolloping stride with which he habitually ends his runway shows.

The fame has been 20 years in the making since the 16-year-old boy of Ghanaian parents set up a studio in London's Portobello Road and, with a little help from Tommy Nutter, tailor to the Beatles, landed at the end of Savile Row in 1997. That started a mission that brought him to the attention of Prime Minister Tony Blair, as a voice on the British design industry.

"When I moved here, the international profile of Savile Row was zero," says Boateng. "Yet the suit was born on Savile Row. In Britain we don't shout enough. So I took it on myself to make it known to the world."

Now tailor to the stars - with a galaxy from Richard Branson and David Bowie to Jamie Foxx, Jude Law and Samuel L. Jackson, to Seal and Usher - Boateng is really a classic tailor, who gave the suit a kick by bringing a raw sexual charge to the silhouette and a vivid color to the lining.

"I love British tradition," Boateng says. "My father was a teacher, and colonial countries of the past took on the traditions of the British."

As a kid, the future designer got something else from his parents: a double-breasted purple suit made by his mother for his fifth birthday - which ignited his enthusiasm for tailoring and, he claims, can still be found in an adult version on his runways.

Boateng has two specifics. He is black and straight - although he has never "made a point" of his color nor traded on his private life.

"I have a lot of gay clients - there is a boldness that the pink dollar appreciates in me," says Boateng. "Then there is the sex appeal. I have consciously, in my mind, wanted to create sexy clothes for men."

It was not until 1990 that the designer went to Ghana for the first time - a seminal experience for two reasons: he realized when he saw the "fantastic cloth wrapping in most amazing colors" that they were also the same color combinations that he instinctively used; and "because everyone was black, and I had never experienced that in my life."

The designer might be compared to Sean (Diddy) Combs, whom he admires for having succeeded in so many different areas. But Boateng started his career in the 1980s and, significantly, his fashion hero is Giorgio Armani. (When Jamie Foxx appears dressed by Boateng in the new "Miami Vice" movie, it will be sweet for him to follow in Armani's wake.)

"I respect Armani for his consistency," says Boateng, who was pleased to find when he celebrated 20 years in fashion at the Victoria & Albert Museum in November, that when he mixed "a jacket from 10 years ago with trousers from five" they "blended into one contemporary collection."

In 2003, Boateng was tapped by the luxury group LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton to take on Givenchy menswear. He defines the difference between the two labels as "my look has a strong, traditional Britishness and is very masculine" while Givenchy "tends to be more fluid and feminine."

When Hubert de Givenchy himself visited Boateng in Savile Row, the young designer was "blown away" by "the refinement of this man - he is an aristocrat and a gentleman."

Marco Gobetti, Givenchy's chief executive, sees the British designer in line with the company vision of "classic clothing about cut and cloth." He says that while not "re-inventing anything in fashion," Boateng has taken "the direction we want to go" and captured the elegance at the heart of Givenchy - the man and the brand.

Boateng has other projects in his sights, saying: "I want to expand, I want to get into womenswear - I'm ready." But he knows from experience that it will be tough - unless he finds a partner. Building up his self-financed company to an annual turnover of £10 million, or $17.5 million, has been difficult and a recent venture to launch a lower-priced line with the Marchpole fashion group ended up in the courtroom.

"One thing I've found an enormous challenge is the lack of manufacturing and industry support," says Boateng, who thinks the Sundance eight-part documentary will "enlighten a lot of people on all the challenges I face being a creative in Britain."

Boateng is proud to have been recognized by the establishment, saying of the time he first met his Queen: "It was an emotional experience - I'd seen her on my money all my life, but never in person." Now there is a task ahead of him before he collects his OBE from Buckingham Palace.

"I think I am going to have to make Oscar a coat," Boateng says, referring to his 3-year-old son. "And it will have to be purple double-breasted mohair, to keep up the tradition!"

LONDON On Thursday, Ozwald Boateng will fly to Los Angeles for the day to stand beside Robert Redford and talk about his life as a British tailor for a documentary that will air on Redford's Sundance television channel in September.

That is after Boateng has finished replying to the flood of letters congratulating him on receiving an Order of the British Empire from Queen Elizabeth - and just three days before his Milan show and two weeks before the Paris presentation of his line for Givenchy.

Boateng, 38, who has just returned from vacation with his wife, Guynel, and their two children, is taking it all in the lolloping stride with which he habitually ends his runway shows.

The fame has been 20 years in the making since the 16-year-old boy of Ghanaian parents set up a studio in London's Portobello Road and, with a little help from Tommy Nutter, tailor to the Beatles, landed at the end of Savile Row in 1997. That started a mission that brought him to the attention of Prime Minister Tony Blair, as a voice on the British design industry.

"When I moved here, the international profile of Savile Row was zero," says Boateng. "Yet the suit was born on Savile Row. In Britain we don't shout enough. So I took it on myself to make it known to the world."

Now tailor to the stars - with a galaxy from Richard Branson and David Bowie to Jamie Foxx, Jude Law and Samuel L. Jackson, to Seal and Usher - Boateng is really a classic tailor, who gave the suit a kick by bringing a raw sexual charge to the silhouette and a vivid color to the lining.

"I love British tradition," Boateng says. "My father was a teacher, and colonial countries of the past took on the traditions of the British."

As a kid, the future designer got something else from his parents: a double-breasted purple suit made by his mother for his fifth birthday - which ignited his enthusiasm for tailoring and, he claims, can still be found in an adult version on his runways.

Boateng has two specifics. He is black and straight - although he has never "made a point" of his color nor traded on his private life.

"I have a lot of gay clients - there is a boldness that the pink dollar appreciates in me," says Boateng. "Then there is the sex appeal. I have consciously, in my mind, wanted to create sexy clothes for men."

It was not until 1990 that the designer went to Ghana for the first time - a seminal experience for two reasons: he realized when he saw the "fantastic cloth wrapping in most amazing colors" that they were also the same color combinations that he instinctively used; and "because everyone was black, and I had never experienced that in my life."

The designer might be compared to Sean (Diddy) Combs, whom he admires for having succeeded in so many different areas. But Boateng started his career in the 1980s and, significantly, his fashion hero is Giorgio Armani. (When Jamie Foxx appears dressed by Boateng in the new "Miami Vice" movie, it will be sweet for him to follow in Armani's wake.)

"I respect Armani for his consistency," says Boateng, who was pleased to find when he celebrated 20 years in fashion at the Victoria & Albert Museum in November, that when he mixed "a jacket from 10 years ago with trousers from five" they "blended into one contemporary collection."

In 2003, Boateng was tapped by the luxury group LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton to take on Givenchy menswear. He defines the difference between the two labels as "my look has a strong, traditional Britishness and is very masculine" while Givenchy "tends to be more fluid and feminine."

When Hubert de Givenchy himself visited Boateng in Savile Row, the young designer was "blown away" by "the refinement of this man - he is an aristocrat and a gentleman."

Marco Gobetti, Givenchy's chief executive, sees the British designer in line with the company vision of "classic clothing about cut and cloth." He says that while not "re-inventing anything in fashion," Boateng has taken "the direction we want to go" and captured the elegance at the heart of Givenchy - the man and the brand.

Boateng has other projects in his sights, saying: "I want to expand, I want to get into womenswear - I'm ready." But he knows from experience that it will be tough - unless he finds a partner. Building up his self-financed company to an annual turnover of £10 million, or $17.5 million, has been difficult and a recent venture to launch a lower-priced line with the Marchpole fashion group ended up in the courtroom.

"One thing I've found an enormous challenge is the lack of manufacturing and industry support," says Boateng, who thinks the Sundance eight-part documentary will "enlighten a lot of people on all the challenges I face being a creative in Britain."

Boateng is proud to have been recognized by the establishment, saying of the time he first met his Queen: "It was an emotional experience - I'd seen her on my money all my life, but never in person." Now there is a task ahead of him before he collects his OBE from Buckingham Palace.

"I think I am going to have to make Oscar a coat," Boateng says, referring to his 3-year-old son. "And it will have to be purple double-breasted mohair, to keep up the tradition!"

LONDON On Thursday, Ozwald Boateng will fly to Los Angeles for the day to stand beside Robert Redford and talk about his life as a British tailor for a documentary that will air on Redford's Sundance television channel in September.

That is after Boateng has finished replying to the flood of letters congratulating him on receiving an Order of the British Empire from Queen Elizabeth - and just three days before his Milan show and two weeks before the Paris presentation of his line for Givenchy.

Boateng, 38, who has just returned from vacation with his wife, Guynel, and their two children, is taking it all in the lolloping stride with which he habitually ends his runway shows.

The fame has been 20 years in the making since the 16-year-old boy of Ghanaian parents set up a studio in London's Portobello Road and, with a little help from Tommy Nutter, tailor to the Beatles, landed at the end of Savile Row in 1997. That started a mission that brought him to the attention of Prime Minister Tony Blair, as a voice on the British design industry.

"When I moved here, the international profile of Savile Row was zero," says Boateng. "Yet the suit was born on Savile Row. In Britain we don't shout enough. So I took it on myself to make it known to the world."

Now tailor to the stars - with a galaxy from Richard Branson and David Bowie to Jamie Foxx, Jude Law and Samuel L. Jackson, to Seal and Usher - Boateng is really a classic tailor, who gave the suit a kick by bringing a raw sexual charge to the silhouette and a vivid color to the lining.

"I love British tradition," Boateng says. "My father was a teacher, and colonial countries of the past took on the traditions of the British."

As a kid, the future designer got something else from his parents: a double-breasted purple suit made by his mother for his fifth birthday - which ignited his enthusiasm for tailoring and, he claims, can still be found in an adult version on his runways.

Boateng has two specifics. He is black and straight - although he has never "made a point" of his color nor traded on his private life.

"I have a lot of gay clients - there is a boldness that the pink dollar appreciates in me," says Boateng. "Then there is the sex appeal. I have consciously, in my mind, wanted to create sexy clothes for men."

It was not until 1990 that the designer went to Ghana for the first time - a seminal experience for two reasons: he realized when he saw the "fantastic cloth wrapping in most amazing colors" that they were also the same color combinations that he instinctively used; and "because everyone was black, and I had never experienced that in my life."

The designer might be compared to Sean (Diddy) Combs, whom he admires for having succeeded in so many different areas. But Boateng started his career in the 1980s and, significantly, his fashion hero is Giorgio Armani. (When Jamie Foxx appears dressed by Boateng in the new "Miami Vice" movie, it will be sweet for him to follow in Armani's wake.)

"I respect Armani for his consistency," says Boateng, who was pleased to find when he celebrated 20 years in fashion at the Victoria & Albert Museum in November, that when he mixed "a jacket from 10 years ago with trousers from five" they "blended into one contemporary collection."

In 2003, Boateng was tapped by the luxury group LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton to take on Givenchy menswear. He defines the difference between the two labels as "my look has a strong, traditional Britishness and is very masculine" while Givenchy "tends to be more fluid and feminine."

When Hubert de Givenchy himself visited Boateng in Savile Row, the young designer was "blown away" by "the refinement of this man - he is an aristocrat and a gentleman."

Marco Gobetti, Givenchy's chief executive, sees the British designer in line with the company vision of "classic clothing about cut and cloth." He says that while not "re-inventing anything in fashion," Boateng has taken "the direction we want to go" and captured the elegance at the heart of Givenchy - the man and the brand.

Boateng has other projects in his sights, saying: "I want to expand, I want to get into womenswear - I'm ready." But he knows from experience that it will be tough - unless he finds a partner. Building up his self-financed company to an annual turnover of £10 million, or $17.5 million, has been difficult and a recent venture to launch a lower-priced line with the Marchpole fashion group ended up in the courtroom.

"One thing I've found an enormous challenge is the lack of manufacturing and industry support," says Boateng, who thinks the Sundance eight-part documentary will "enlighten a lot of people on all the challenges I face being a creative in Britain."

Boateng is proud to have been recognized by the establishment, saying of the time he first met his Queen: "It was an emotional experience - I'd seen her on my money all my life, but never in person." Now there is a task ahead of him before he collects his OBE from Buckingham Palace.

"I think I am going to have to make Oscar a coat," Boateng says, referring to his 3-year-old son. "And it will have to be purple double-breasted mohair, to keep up the tradition!"

LONDON On Thursday, Ozwald Boateng will fly to Los Angeles for the day to stand beside Robert Redford and talk about his life as a British tailor for a documentary that will air on Redford's Sundance television channel in September.

That is after Boateng has finished replying to the flood of letters congratulating him on receiving an Order of the British Empire from Queen Elizabeth - and just three days before his Milan show and two weeks before the Paris presentation of his line for Givenchy.

Boateng, 38, who has just returned from vacation with his wife, Guynel, and their two children, is taking it all in the lolloping stride with which he habitually ends his runway shows.

The fame has been 20 years in the making since the 16-year-old boy of Ghanaian parents set up a studio in London's Portobello Road and, with a little help from Tommy Nutter, tailor to the Beatles, landed at the end of Savile Row in 1997. That started a mission that brought him to the attention of Prime Minister Tony Blair, as a voice on the British design industry.

"When I moved here, the international profile of Savile Row was zero," says Boateng. "Yet the suit was born on Savile Row. In Britain we don't shout enough. So I took it on myself to make it known to the world."

Now tailor to the stars - with a galaxy from Richard Branson and David Bowie to Jamie Foxx, Jude Law and Samuel L. Jackson, to Seal and Usher - Boateng is really a classic tailor, who gave the suit a kick by bringing a raw sexual charge to the silhouette and a vivid color to the lining.

"I love British tradition," Boateng says. "My father was a teacher, and colonial countries of the past took on the traditions of the British."

As a kid, the future designer got something else from his parents: a double-breasted purple suit made by his mother for his fifth birthday - which ignited his enthusiasm for tailoring and, he claims, can still be found in an adult version on his runways.

Boateng has two specifics. He is black and straight - although he has never "made a point" of his color nor traded on his private life.

"I have a lot of gay clients - there is a boldness that the pink dollar appreciates in me," says Boateng. "Then there is the sex appeal. I have consciously, in my mind, wanted to create sexy clothes for men."

It was not until 1990 that the designer went to Ghana for the first time - a seminal experience for two reasons: he realized when he saw the "fantastic cloth wrapping in most amazing colors" that they were also the same color combinations that he instinctively used; and "because everyone was black, and I had never experienced that in my life."

The designer might be compared to Sean (Diddy) Combs, whom he admires for having succeeded in so many different areas. But Boateng started his career in the 1980s and, significantly, his fashion hero is Giorgio Armani. (When Jamie Foxx appears dressed by Boateng in the new "Miami Vice" movie, it will be sweet for him to follow in Armani's wake.)

"I respect Armani for his consistency," says Boateng, who was pleased to find when he celebrated 20 years in fashion at the Victoria & Albert Museum in November, that when he mixed "a jacket from 10 years ago with trousers from five" they "blended into one contemporary collection."

In 2003, Boateng was tapped by the luxury group LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton to take on Givenchy menswear. He defines the difference between the two labels as "my look has a strong, traditional Britishness and is very masculine" while Givenchy "tends to be more fluid and feminine."

When Hubert de Givenchy himself visited Boateng in Savile Row, the young designer was "blown away" by "the refinement of this man - he is an aristocrat and a gentleman."

Marco Gobetti, Givenchy's chief executive, sees the British designer in line with the company vision of "classic clothing about cut and cloth." He says that while not "re-inventing anything in fashion," Boateng has taken "the direction we want to go" and captured the elegance at the heart of Givenchy - the man and the brand.

Boateng has other projects in his sights, saying: "I want to expand, I want to get into womenswear - I'm ready." But he knows from experience that it will be tough - unless he finds a partner. Building up his self-financed company to an annual turnover of £10 million, or $17.5 million, has been difficult and a recent venture to launch a lower-priced line with the Marchpole fashion group ended up in the courtroom.

"One thing I've found an enormous challenge is the lack of manufacturing and industry support," says Boateng, who thinks the Sundance eight-part documentary will "enlighten a lot of people on all the challenges I face being a creative in Britain."

Boateng is proud to have been recognized by the establishment, saying of the time he first met his Queen: "It was an emotional experience - I'd seen her on my money all my life, but never in person." Now there is a task ahead of him before he collects his OBE from Buckingham Palace.

"I think I am going to have to make Oscar a coat," Boateng says, referring to his 3-year-old son. "And it will have to be purple double-breasted mohair, to keep up the tradition!"



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#31 Sankofa

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Posted 29 January 2006 - 10:11 AM

QUOTE
"My father was a teacher, and colonial countries of the past took on the traditions of the British."


its ok..Gaz i dont think we need him....LOL

#32 kk damah

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Posted 01 March 2009 - 10:24 PM

oo please wat is this love affair with Oz Boateng and spend our hard earned money on him? he is not even for African people.. the guy is White in everything but Skin!!

i have never heard him talk about his heritage!! Fck Boateng!! UNCLE TOM!!

Cannot we think of anything else to do with our money than spend it on some obroni butt munching uncle tom!!?? blink.gif




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