Jump to content


Photo

Folk Tales And African Mythology


  • Please log in to reply
18 replies to this topic

#1 Oshun

Oshun

    Family

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 818 posts
  • Gender:Female

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    AfricanCarribean

Posted 18 October 2006 - 09:40 PM

I've been cyber flicking through the pages of the site and found a suggestion by Coltrane a while back that we should have a Folk Tales and Mythology forum which i thought was a fabulous idea.

The advice from Admin was to start a thread in the Cultural forum, as this has not been done then i thought i'd start it (Coltrane hope you don't mind not trying to steal your thunder or anything!).

Ours has always been an aural history and many stories and folkloric tales have been forgotten and lost because of this so if we could start to put the stories we do know down here i think it would help us keep them alive for our children and they're children etc....
It is also a good oportunity for many of us to seek out and research tales and mythologies from our great continant which can only add to the richness and beauty of our people in my veiw. So on that note i will start:

This is from the Yoruba culture and one of the many stories of the Orishas(Gods)

Chango (god of thunder and sexual deviant) and his ongoing fued with Ogun (god of war)

Yemaya (goddess of seas and oceans) is the mother of Chango & Ogun, Ogun insulted Yemaya in some way and so Chango seduced Oguns wife (Oya goddess of wind and turbulance) in repayment for the affrontage to they're mother. This is why Chango and Ogun are always depicted as fighting and being at war with one another.


[I am not from the Yoruban culture so if i have got any of this wrong then i apologies but this legend was passed to me aurally from someone who knows about these things!]
SHINE ON, daughter of a thousand generations, send your light fourth into this tired world...
SHINE ON, mother of a thousand dreams tend to those dreams with strength and compassion...
SHINE ON, woman of a thousand hopes, show everyone the beauty within you - the beauty that comes from knowing who you are

#2 Oshun

Oshun

    Family

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 818 posts
  • Gender:Female

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    AfricanCarribean

Posted 29 October 2006 - 07:22 PM

The Lion and The Peacock

There was once a lion and a peacock who were very great friends. They liked nothing better than meeting in a forest clearing on warm sunny afternoons and eating they're food together.

One afternoon, the lion was tearing into huge chunks of meat when he noticed the peacock was scractching the earth and burying plum stones.

"Surely you can find a better way of spending your time" he said lazily.

The peacock being a proud bird who thought he knew everything replied in amazement "how can you be so stupid?, you must be the only animal in the forest who dosent know why its important to plant plum stones. Trees grow from the stones and provide lots of nice, juicy plums."

The lion felt very hurt at being called stupid. "I'll show him i'm as clever as he is" so he carefully buried the bones left over from his meal.

Some weeks later the friends met up again in the same clearing. The peacock was feeling particularly pleased with himself because the plum stones had begun to sprout. He laughed when he saw the lion scratching at the ground anxiously trying to find a bone that had begun to grow.

"Your even more stupid than i thought" said the peacock. "Everyone knows that you can't make bones grow by burying them in the ground."

Time passed and when the two met again in the clearing it was full of plum trees laden with fruit. The peacock beamed with pleasure but the lion looked sad. He had caught nothing to eat that day and would have to go hungry whilst his friend feasted on rich plums.

"Its a pity that your not as clever as i am" said the peacock proudly. "i'll always have enough to eat while you'll often go hungry."

But the peacock should have known that pride comes before a fall because the lion had had enough of his haughty ways. So, with a quick pounce, he leaped on the peacock and gobbled him up!!


laugh.gif
SHINE ON, daughter of a thousand generations, send your light fourth into this tired world...
SHINE ON, mother of a thousand dreams tend to those dreams with strength and compassion...
SHINE ON, woman of a thousand hopes, show everyone the beauty within you - the beauty that comes from knowing who you are

#3 Djehutis Wisdom

Djehutis Wisdom

    Family

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1259 posts

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    Jamaican

Posted 29 October 2006 - 09:28 PM

There was a mother vulture and a mother wildcat who were close neighbours. The vulture had four chicks and the wildcat had given birth to four kittens. The mother vulture and the mother wildcat had a big problem. Their children were hungry but the two mothers were both afraid to leave them alone because they feared that either one of them would kill the other's children for food.

The mothers arranged a truce between them by swearing an oath upon the name of Ra. They swore that neither one would hurt the other's children. So noe they both felt secure enough to go out and start hunting food for their children. For some time the truce worked, and soon the vultur chicks and the children began to grow.

One day, one of the vulture chicks went to the area where the kittens were playing. He snatched away a portion of their food. One of the kittens reached out and swatted the chikc, injuring it, and told it to find it's own food. The chick could not fly but had enough strength to tell the kitten, "you have broken the oath between our families and Ra will punish you for this great injustice."

When the mother vulture returned she noticed that her chick was lying on the ground so she figured that the wildcat had broken her promise. The next time that the wildcat left to go hunting the mother vulture killed all of the kittens and bought them back to her nest for food.

When the mother wildcat returned she realised that the mother vulture had killed her kittens, so she cried out to Ra, "O Divine one who upholds justice and righteousness, punish the evil doer who has broken the oath which was sworn upon your name!" Ra heard this plea and set the plan in motion to carry out the punishment for this transgression.

The next day as the mother vulture was hunting she came upon a campfire which had a portion of meat being cooked and there was no one in sight. She swooped down and grabbed it and quickly returned to her nest and dropped it there for her chicks to feast on. She had not noticed that there was a smoldering piece of coal attached to the meat. The nest caught fire and the three chicks were burnt to death. Noticing this the mother wildcat yelled out, "You killed my children and now Ra has punished you!"

THESE ARE THE WISE WORDS OF DJEHUTI, SPOKEN TO HETHERU IN HIS FIRST PARABLE. I'M TRYING TO MAKE SENSE OF IT MYSELF BUT I THOUGHT YOU COULD ALL USE SOME ANCIENT WISDOM TOO.
I was born with two ears and one mouth. One guess as to which should be used more.


#4 African_Mamba

African_Mamba

    Advanced Contributor

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 167 posts

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    Somali

Posted 31 October 2006 - 01:00 PM

Empress Arrawelo

According to the Somali oral tradition, Arrawelo was a powerful ruler belonging to one of the then dominant tribes of Puntland (Somalia). She might have ruled Somalia around 1000 B.C. or so. According to folklore, she ruled for not less than 70 or 80 years. She loved power and wanted to remain the empress of the country till her death. She was very suspicious of men and hated them. At one stage, she ordered that any son born in any family in the kingdom must be castrated so that he may not be able to procreate.

She got married and a daughter was born to her. In due course her daughter grew up, got married and gave birth to a son. Empress Arrawelo wanted her daughter's son to be killed. Her daughter prayed to her to let him live till the time he could sit. Arrawelo agreed to her request. In about a year, when the baby could sit easily, the Empress wanted him to be killed. Her daughter requested her to let him live till he could stand. This request was also granted. Then the daughter requested her to postpone his killing till he could walk. Then she requested his killing to be postponed till he could talk. Later on she requested her to let him help her in collecting water, fuel and food etc. which were necessary for her being a mother, till he came of age at 18. Out of her fondness for her daughter, the Empress agreed to this request also.

In the meanwhile, the daughter secretly trained her adolescent son to defend himself.

Then a severe drought took place. All the wells dried up. One day all the people came with their animals to an important well, which had plenty of water for men and animals. But Arrawelo ordered that nobody could take even a drop of water till she had completed her bath. A big leather tub was brought. People started drawing out water from the well and pouring it in the Empress' bath tub. They let her bathe throughout the day, but she did not finish her bath. The people were getting tired and restless due to the sun, thirst and labour, but she kept saying again and again: "This particular finger has not yet been cleaned, that one has not yet been cleaned." People suffered the torture mutely. But the Empress' eighteen year old grand son (daughter's son) could no longer bear this cruelty, hatred and hypocrisy of Arrawelo. He become very angry and suddenly struck her with his weapon (spear) and killed her. When she was alive, she used to speak and shout like men, but when her grand-son struck her she cried out "Ba'aayee" ("I have lost myself").

According to the Somali language, when a Somali girl or woman suffers any loss she expresses it by using this word "Ba'Aayee"; but when a Somali boy or male suffers any loss, he uses another word "Tota'yaa" ("I have been helpless, I have become without my tribe, the love and unity or grace of my people are lost, I am deserted and broken.")

Arrawelo was a very secretive, suspicious and a cruel he-woman having both the characteristics of female as well as a male and she spoke very harshly and acted very hard-heartedly. She was a real terror to all her male subjects who shivered at the sight of her and were rendered as cowards before her. They had all along been thinking, she was a male. But when she uttered her last words "ba'aayee", then all of them of at once discovered that she (Arrawelo) was not a man but a woman. They congratulated the boy for killing her.

He said to them, "What you have all along been afraid of was in fact a woman, not a man." The story of the Somali Empress Arrawelo occupies a very prominent place in the oral poetry tradition of the Somali people. Its historical authenticity seems to be perfect. She might have indeed been a very ruthless ruler-the first and so far the last woman ruler in the 7,000 years old tradition and history of Somalia. That her subjects were worried about providing water to their animals shows that they were pastoral people inhabiting the draught-prone region and that could in all probability be the northern region of Somalia, then called Puntland, in about 1000 B.C. or so.
I have no forts, no houses, no country. I have no cultivated fields, no silver, no gold for you to take. I have nothing. If the country were cultivated or contained houses or property, it would be worth your while to fight. The country is all jungle, and that is of no use to you. If you want wood and stone, you can get them in plenty. There are also many ant-heaps. The sun is very hot. All you can get from me is war - nothing else. I. God is with me when I write this. If you wish for war, I am happy; and, if you wish for peace, I am content also. But if you wish for peace, go Solvay from my country back to your own.." (Maxamed Cabdulle Xasan, Sayyid-Mad Mullah of somalia)Letter to british people during colonialism.


#5 Oshun

Oshun

    Family

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 818 posts
  • Gender:Female

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    AfricanCarribean

Posted 04 December 2006 - 10:46 PM

Orunmila, who, during a time when the water orisa were said to be angry with men, was informed in a dream to go to the ocean shore and offer sacrifice. Others had been afraid to approach the awesome angry ocean energy, but Orunmila did as instructed. After he had offered sacrifice, a huge wind began to whip the ocean in to mountainous waves. Suddenly one wave, so huge that it blotted out the sky and sun, rose directly in front of Orunmila. He was afraid that he would be swept away to his death by it. Instead of sweeping him away, however, the wave hovered directly over his head and then seemed to settle gently to the shore at his feet. As the water receded back in to the ocean, Orunmila looked down to see mounds of pearls and precious stones left by the water. Once again, the orisa had been appeased and humankind had been rewarded.
SHINE ON, daughter of a thousand generations, send your light fourth into this tired world...
SHINE ON, mother of a thousand dreams tend to those dreams with strength and compassion...
SHINE ON, woman of a thousand hopes, show everyone the beauty within you - the beauty that comes from knowing who you are

#6 Oshun

Oshun

    Family

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 818 posts
  • Gender:Female

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    AfricanCarribean

Posted 01 January 2007 - 11:16 PM

Following will be a series of short stories from the indigenous people of Australia called
Tales of Dreamtime


The Boastful Hunter

There was a young man called Marloo, which means little kangaroo, and he was a very fine hunter; and everyone new this and often told him so.
However, they soon stopped telling him this because he became very conceited and continually boasted about how good he was.

As time passed, the young man's boasting became so annoying that the people were forced to approach the Wirinun, which means wise man, to see if he could make him stop.

That night, the Wirinun consulted the spirits for advice, and the next morning called the people together and told them that there was a very special kangaroo close by,and warned the hunters not to waste they're time trying to kill it because many hunters had tried and failed.

"I will kill it" said the boastful young man.
"But it is impossible to kill it" said the Wirinun, then added: " but we would all like to see if you could"
"Than come" said the young man " I will show you what a good hunter i am"

That was exactly what the wise old man had intended. So, the next morning, the young man set off to track the animal, accompanied by the whole tribe, and soon located the kangaroo.

"There it is" said the Wirinun, and instructed the people to make camp and watch as the young man steahthily approached the animal, which seemed completely unaware of his presence, and cast his spear which missed.

The young man tried again and again, and missed every time, so the tribe began to call him a boastful young fool, and laughed so much that he was forced to run away embarassed by they're lack of respect.

What the young hunter didn't know was that a Mingga, that is a tree spirit, had conjured a continous line of magic grubs to encircle the animal to protect it.
However he had learned that no matter how good you are, you should never boast about it. And he must of remembered it because the people never heard from him again.
SHINE ON, daughter of a thousand generations, send your light fourth into this tired world...
SHINE ON, mother of a thousand dreams tend to those dreams with strength and compassion...
SHINE ON, woman of a thousand hopes, show everyone the beauty within you - the beauty that comes from knowing who you are

#7 Oshun

Oshun

    Family

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 818 posts
  • Gender:Female

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    AfricanCarribean

Posted 04 January 2007 - 08:33 PM

A LIE IS FOREVER

Boomali and his cousin Goolangi, were conducting their first hunt after their bora, that is the ceremony that marked them as men.

The hunt had not gone well and it looked as if they would return to they're baanya (camp) without having made a kill.

"what shall we do?" Boomali asked his cousin. "We cannot return empty handed, that would be embarrassing"

Goolangi was of the same mind, and furrowed his brow thoughtfully. " lets try the billabong," he replied finallly. "The sun will be down soon, so there may be animals watering there."

Boomali agreed. So resting his spears upon his shoulder, he followed his cousin.

When the young hunters arrived at the edge of the scrub near the waterehole, all was very quiet. There was not a single animal there. Suddenly, Boomali caught his breath, because, cresting the rise were two bindars, or kangaroos. They were making for the water which glowed red, reflecting the suns rays as it sank slowly beyond the horizon.

"They have not sensed us yet" Goolagi whispered, as he lowered his spears from his shoulder. Then, moving very cautiously he selected a spear and rested the remaining two on the ground. Boomali did likewise. Then, just as slowly the two hunters raised their spears. Then, when the two bindars were within range they cast them as one.

Goolangi's aim was true and watched breathlessly as his spear sped towards the unsuspecting animal and dropped it in its tracks.

Unfortunately, Boomali's spear fell short and startled his quarry, which raised itself to its full height and gazed about, uncertain of what was happening. Then before it could recognise the danger, Goolangi's second spear also found its mark and dropped the animal within a metre of its mate.

"Why didn't you throw another spear cousin?" Goolangi demanded. "Had I not acted quickly, we would have lost it."

Boomali gazed at his cousin and shook his head in despair. "I cannot believe that i missed." Then he dropped his head in shame. " What will my father say?" he asked. " He will be so disapointed."

Goolangi gazed at his cousin and felt sorry for him. "There are two bindars," he said. Take one, your father will not know that you didn't kill it."

Boomali thought about it briefly, and then shook his head slowly. "I cannot do that," he said softly, then added: "My father will get over his disapointment in time, and i shall get over my shame, but my lie will remain with me always."

Goolagi touched his cousin's shoulder. "Your right," he said "I should not have suggested it." He then added "Come on cousin, lets take our meat home."
SHINE ON, daughter of a thousand generations, send your light fourth into this tired world...
SHINE ON, mother of a thousand dreams tend to those dreams with strength and compassion...
SHINE ON, woman of a thousand hopes, show everyone the beauty within you - the beauty that comes from knowing who you are

#8 Mogho Naaba

Mogho Naaba

    Family

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3233 posts

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    Afrikan by way of the Native Indian homelands

Posted 04 January 2007 - 09:07 PM

Keep 'em coming!! clap.gif clap.gif clap.gif

#9 Djehutis Wisdom

Djehutis Wisdom

    Family

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1259 posts

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    Jamaican

Posted 04 January 2007 - 09:36 PM

Does anyone have any Anansi. I used to love him when I was young. I used to think it was a jamaican folktale character but now I know better.
I was born with two ears and one mouth. One guess as to which should be used more.


#10 Oshun

Oshun

    Family

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 818 posts
  • Gender:Female

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    AfricanCarribean

Posted 06 January 2007 - 01:55 PM

ANANSI, FIREFLY, AND TIGER

Author: unknown
One day Firefly came to Anansi the Spider's house and invited him to go egg hunting.
"If you would like to go with me, then come to my house late this evening."

Anansi was very excited and immediately agreed to go.

When it was dark enough, they went out into the fields. Firefly would open his wings a little and his light would illuminate the eggs lying hidden in the grass.

Then Anansi would jump forward and yell, "Mine, I saw it first," and toss it in his sack.

They continued like this for the rest of the evening. Anansi was so rude that he grabbed every single egg and Firefly didn't get a single one. Soon Anansi's sack was so full he could barely pull it.

Finally, Firefly said, "Goodbye, Anansi," and flew quickly back home.

Anansi was left alone in the dark with no idea how to get home. Slowly he began to fumble his way back to his house.

He couldn't see a thing, but eventually he bumped into a house. He didn't know whose house it was, so he thought up a scheme.

"Godfather," he called out.

A deep, gruff voice answered back, "Who is that outside of my house?"

Anansi called out; "It is I, your godson Anansi!"

Just then Tiger stuck his huge hairy head out of the door and glared down on the little spider. Tiger knew that he had no godsons, and he knew that Anansi had tricked him many times in the past.

But Tiger was also clever, and said, "Come in, Godson," and shut the door behind Anansi. Tiger had his wife put a big copper kettle of water on the fire so they could boil the eggs.

When they were ready, Tiger, his wife, and all of their children started to eat them hungrily.

"Anansi, my godson, would you like some eggs?" Tiger asked.

Anansi nervously shook his head. "No thank you, Godfather."

When the eggs were all gone, Tiger put a lobster in the kettle and then covered it in some leftover shells, so that it looked like there were more eggs inside. He then put the kettle on the floor and said, "You should stay for the night, Godson," and grinned so that all of his sharp, gleaming teeth were showing.

During the night, when everyone fell asleep, Anansi crept over to the kettle and reached inside.

As soon as he did so, the lobster pinched him hard and he yelled out in surprise.

"Godson," Tiger called out, "are you alright?"

Anansi answered back, "I was bitten by a dog-flea. Please excuse me, Godfather!"

After a few minutes he tried again to grab an egg and received another pinch.

"Godson, are you sure that you are alright?"

Anansi responded, "Oh, Godfather, these dog-fleas are eating me alive."

Tiger sat up and shouted at the top of his voice, "Dog-fleas?! How dare you accuse us of having dog-fleas in this fine house, after we have fed you and given you a place to sleep!"

Tiger jumped out of bed roaring and started to come after Anansi.

Anansi then flew out of bed and raced out the door, terrified for his life.

Tiger came to the door and smiled to himself as he watched the poor little spider running away.

Anansi never went back to Tiger's house and every time he went to visit Firefly, his wife told Anansi that her husband was gone and to please come back next month.

Anansi never did figure out where the field was where all of the eggs were hidden, and he had much time to think about how his greediness had left him with nothing.
SHINE ON, daughter of a thousand generations, send your light fourth into this tired world...
SHINE ON, mother of a thousand dreams tend to those dreams with strength and compassion...
SHINE ON, woman of a thousand hopes, show everyone the beauty within you - the beauty that comes from knowing who you are

#11 Oshun

Oshun

    Family

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 818 posts
  • Gender:Female

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    AfricanCarribean

Posted 30 January 2007 - 11:24 AM

The Sky Hunters

In The Dreamtime, a fearsome tribe had no respect for tribal boundaries. They walked and hunted wherever they wished, and woe betide anyone who challenged then. Therefore, they were seldom confronted, or approached for that matter, because the people were afraid of them.

In time things became so bad that Baime, the Great Spirit, appeared in the dream of their wirinun, that is wise man, and told him to tell his own people to remain within they're own boundaries or suffer the consequences.

Sadly, the wise man was very conceited. Because he truly believed that his tribe was far above all other tribes and, therefore not bound by tribal boundaries, he ignored the Great Spirit's warning.

Now, every sensible person knows that you must never ignore the Spirits warning, least of all the greatest spirit of them all, so what followed was the result of conceit and stupidity.

After several days of raiding, the tribe returned to their own land, laden with meat, fish, sticks for spears, and white clay that they had stolen from other tribes' lands. And that evening, they celebrated with a great feast.

They gorged themselves so much that they became very tired, and settled down to sleep.

It was then that Baime acted, because, when the tribe woke the next morning they were suprised to find that their camp was no longer on their own land, but high in the sky.

The Great Spirit's punishment for their disobedience was that they would hunt across the sky for all time. And if you look carefully, especiallly at night, you may see them breifly as they race across the sky, pursuing the elusive animals placed there by the Great Spirit. They are called meteorites, or comets, and some even call them falling stars, or shooting stars, but we know what they really are, don't we?
SHINE ON, daughter of a thousand generations, send your light fourth into this tired world...
SHINE ON, mother of a thousand dreams tend to those dreams with strength and compassion...
SHINE ON, woman of a thousand hopes, show everyone the beauty within you - the beauty that comes from knowing who you are

#12 Djehutis Wisdom

Djehutis Wisdom

    Family

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1259 posts

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    Jamaican

Posted 30 January 2007 - 11:34 AM

QUOTE (Oshun @ Jan 6 2007, 01:55 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
ANANSI, FIREFLY, AND TIGER

Author: unknown
One day Firefly came to Anansi the Spider's house and invited him to go egg hunting.
"If you would like to go with me, then come to my house late this evening."

Anansi was very excited and immediately agreed to go.

When it was dark enough, they went out into the fields. Firefly would open his wings a little and his light would illuminate the eggs lying hidden in the grass.

Then Anansi would jump forward and yell, "Mine, I saw it first," and toss it in his sack.

They continued like this for the rest of the evening. Anansi was so rude that he grabbed every single egg and Firefly didn't get a single one. Soon Anansi's sack was so full he could barely pull it.

Finally, Firefly said, "Goodbye, Anansi," and flew quickly back home.

Anansi was left alone in the dark with no idea how to get home. Slowly he began to fumble his way back to his house.

He couldn't see a thing, but eventually he bumped into a house. He didn't know whose house it was, so he thought up a scheme.

"Godfather," he called out.

A deep, gruff voice answered back, "Who is that outside of my house?"

Anansi called out; "It is I, your godson Anansi!"

Just then Tiger stuck his huge hairy head out of the door and glared down on the little spider. Tiger knew that he had no godsons, and he knew that Anansi had tricked him many times in the past.

But Tiger was also clever, and said, "Come in, Godson," and shut the door behind Anansi. Tiger had his wife put a big copper kettle of water on the fire so they could boil the eggs.

When they were ready, Tiger, his wife, and all of their children started to eat them hungrily.

"Anansi, my godson, would you like some eggs?" Tiger asked.

Anansi nervously shook his head. "No thank you, Godfather."

When the eggs were all gone, Tiger put a lobster in the kettle and then covered it in some leftover shells, so that it looked like there were more eggs inside. He then put the kettle on the floor and said, "You should stay for the night, Godson," and grinned so that all of his sharp, gleaming teeth were showing.

During the night, when everyone fell asleep, Anansi crept over to the kettle and reached inside.

As soon as he did so, the lobster pinched him hard and he yelled out in surprise.

"Godson," Tiger called out, "are you alright?"

Anansi answered back, "I was bitten by a dog-flea. Please excuse me, Godfather!"

After a few minutes he tried again to grab an egg and received another pinch.

"Godson, are you sure that you are alright?"

Anansi responded, "Oh, Godfather, these dog-fleas are eating me alive."

Tiger sat up and shouted at the top of his voice, "Dog-fleas?! How dare you accuse us of having dog-fleas in this fine house, after we have fed you and given you a place to sleep!"

Tiger jumped out of bed roaring and started to come after Anansi.

Anansi then flew out of bed and raced out the door, terrified for his life.

Tiger came to the door and smiled to himself as he watched the poor little spider running away.

Anansi never went back to Tiger's house and every time he went to visit Firefly, his wife told Anansi that her husband was gone and to please come back next month.

Anansi never did figure out where the field was where all of the eggs were hidden, and he had much time to think about how his greediness had left him with nothing.



Greetings big sis,

Thanks for this. I just noticed it. It's been a long time since I heard any anansi and that spider's attitude definitely brings me back. Where did you get that, I'd love to see some more?
I was born with two ears and one mouth. One guess as to which should be used more.


#13 Oshun

Oshun

    Family

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 818 posts
  • Gender:Female

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    AfricanCarribean

Posted 30 January 2007 - 11:52 AM

Hello little bruv, these particular stories come from a website called motherland nigeria

http://www.motherlan...om/stories.html

glad you liked that one here is another one which is quite funny smile.gif


ANANSI AND THE PHANTOM FOOD

Author: unknown
It was the dry season. Anansi's people were starving. He told his people that he was going to find food. He left and walked many miles, until at last he saw smoke from a distant village.

When he got there the town was full of cassava--just cassava! One cassava asked, "Would you like us roasted, fried, or boiled? Anansi told them that it didn't matter, so they roasted themselves.

The spider was just sitting down to eat when he saw a column of smoke on the horizon. He asked, "My people, who lives at that far place?" One cassava told him that plantains (bananas) live there. The spider started to leave but the cassavas didn't want him to go. Anansi left anyway.

When he reached the village, the plantains approached him. They all asked if he wanted them roasted, fried, or boiled. He told them it didn't matter because he was so hungry that he would eat them anyway at all. Anansi just sat down to eat when he saw smoke rising from a town near the horizon. He asked who lived there, and the plantains said that the rice lived there. The spider started to leave but the plantains urged him to stay. It was too late, but Anansi left anyway.

Anansi came to the village with the rice. The rice asked if he wanted them roasted, fried, or boiled. He responded with the usual answer. The rice boiled themselves so that he could eat them. Anansi was just beginning to eat when he saw a smoke cloud rising not know who lived there. Anansi took off toward the town thinking that it might be something better than rice.

Anansi walked for a long time. When he finally got to the place, he stopped and rubbed his eyes. He couldn't believe it! It was his own village! Anansi fainted.

When he woke up his wife gave him a bowl of fish bone soup. He told her his story, but she didn't believe him. No one ever believed him because no one was ever able to go to those villages.
SHINE ON, daughter of a thousand generations, send your light fourth into this tired world...
SHINE ON, mother of a thousand dreams tend to those dreams with strength and compassion...
SHINE ON, woman of a thousand hopes, show everyone the beauty within you - the beauty that comes from knowing who you are

#14 Djehutis Wisdom

Djehutis Wisdom

    Family

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1259 posts

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    Jamaican

Posted 30 January 2007 - 12:02 PM

This one is seriously funny. I love seeing Anansi get what he deserves.


ANANSI AND TURTLE
Author: unknown

One day Anansi the spider picked some very fat and tasty yams from his garden. He baked them with much care and they came out smelling quite delicious. He could not wait to sit down and eat them.

Just then there was a knock at his door. It was Turtle, who had been traveling all day and was very tired and hungry.

"Hello, Anansi," said Turtle. "I have been walking for so long, and I smelled the most delicious yams I've ever smelled. Would you be so kind as to share your meal with me?"

Anansi could not refuse, as it was the custom in his country to share your meal with visitors at mealtime. But he was not very happy, for Anansi was a little too greedy and wanted the delicious yams all to himself. So Anansi thought to himself and came up with a scheme.

"Please do come in, Turtle. I would be honored to have you as my guest this evening. Sit down, have a chair and help yourself."

Turtle came inside and sat down, but just as he reached for a yam, Anansi yelled, "Turtle, don't you know better than to come to the table with dirty hands?"

Turtle looked down at his hands and saw that they were filthy. He had been crawling all day and had not had a chance to clean up. Turtle got up and went to the river to clean his feet. He walked all the way back up to the house and Anansi had already begun to eat.

"I didn't want these tasty yams to get cold, so I had to begin," said Anansi. "But please do join me now, Turtle."

Turtle sat down again and reached for a yam, but again Anansi yelled at him.

"Turtle, did you not hear me before? It is not polite to come to the table with dirty hands!"

He looked down and saw that his clean hands had turned dirty once more, since he had to crawl on them to get back to the house. So he walked down to the river once more to wash himself off. And when he returned this time, he was careful to walk on the grass so his hands would stay clean. But by the time he sat down at the table, Anansi had finished up the last bit of the tasty yams and not so much as a morsel was left.

Turtle looked at Anansi for a moment and then said, "Thank you for sharing your meal with me. If you ever find yourself near my house, please let me return the favor." And then he slowly walked out the door and continued on his way. The days went by and Anansi thought more and more of that meal that Turtle had offered. He got more and more interested in a free dinner and finally could not stand it anymore. He set off one day to find Turtle's house.

He found Turtle sunning himself on a riverbank just around dinnertime.

Turtle looked up and saw him and said, "Hello, Anansi, have you come to share evening meal with me?"

"Oh yes, yes!" said Anansi, who was growing hungrier and hungrier by the minute. Turtle went underwater to his house to set up the dinner table for the two of them. Soon he came back to the bank and said, "Your place is waiting and the food is ready. Please join me, Anansi."

And then he dived underwater and began to slowly eat his meal.

Anansi jumped into the water, but could not get down to the bottom of the river. He tried to swim down, but he was so light that he kept popping back up to the surface.

He tried diving. He tried belly flops. He tried a running jump, but nothing would help him get down to the river bottom.

In the meantime, Turtle was slowly eating his meal.

Anansi was not about to give up a free meal, and was running around wondering what he would do. Finally he had an idea. He started grabbing stones and rocks and stuffed them into his jacket pockets.

Now when he jumped into the water he sank right down to the bottom and was able to take his place at the table.

The table was so beautiful and full of delicious foods. Anansi could hardly believe how many tasty foods were before him and could not wait to start his meal.

But just as he reached for the first morsel, Turtle stopped eating and spoke. "In my country, we do not wear our jackets to the table." Anansi noticed that Turtle had removed his own jacket before sitting down. Anansi started to remove his jacket, and as soon as it was off of his shoulders, he went zooming back up to the surface and popped out onto the riverbank. He stuck his head down into the water and saw Turtle slowly enjoying that wonderful banquet.


I was born with two ears and one mouth. One guess as to which should be used more.


#15 Oshun

Oshun

    Family

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 818 posts
  • Gender:Female

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    AfricanCarribean

Posted 30 January 2007 - 04:22 PM

^^ clap.gif ha serve im dyam right! Just for Anasi popcorn.gif mmmmm!
SHINE ON, daughter of a thousand generations, send your light fourth into this tired world...
SHINE ON, mother of a thousand dreams tend to those dreams with strength and compassion...
SHINE ON, woman of a thousand hopes, show everyone the beauty within you - the beauty that comes from knowing who you are

#16 Oshun

Oshun

    Family

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 818 posts
  • Gender:Female

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    AfricanCarribean

Posted 28 April 2007 - 06:46 PM

This one is about the Yoruba God Elegua( God of pathways and trickery) and Orunmila(God of all Gods)

Orunmila had returned to earth to see how all the Babalawos he had trained in the arts of divination were getting along. He decided to travel from town to town and greet his old students.

"Orunmila, how nice to see you," said one. "I don't have time to talk with you now, I have an appointment."

"Orunmila, how are you?" said another. "If you come back on Wednesday, I'll be able to see you."

"Orunmila, I'm very busy with my clients right now," said a third. "Could you come back in a day or so?"

Orunmila was furious. All his old students were ignoring him. They were too concerned with making money and having a big reputation to honor their old teacher. Orunmila decided to teach them a lesson.

He sent out notice that he would challenge all the Babalawos to a contest to see who cast the most accurate oracles. Orunmila figured that, after they had been shamed by his incomparable skill, all the Babalawos would respect him again.

After the notices had been sent, he went to the nearest town and challenged the Babalawo. Orunmila proved to be a far better reader of the oracles, of course. But, the Babalawo refused to pay Orunmila the agreed upon amount.

Elegua, who is never far away and always likes to play tricks, walked up to Orunmila and the Babalawo.

"Hello, Orunmila, how are you today?" said Elegua.

"I am angry, Elegua." fumed Orunmila.

"And, why is that, dear Orunmila?" Elegua tried to stifle his giggles, since he knew perfectly well what had been going on.

"This cheat of a Babalawo has lost a wager with me," answered Orunmila. "And now, he refuses to pay."

Elegua looked up and down the nervous Babalawo. "Is that right? Are you trying to cheat Orunmila?"

"Well, Lord Elegua..." stammered the Babalawo.

Before he could say another word, Elegua reached out and put his powerful warrior's hand around the Babalawo's neck. He looked at the man straight in the eye.

"Tell me," he said softly, "are you looking for trouble?"

"No," squeaked the Babalawo.

Elegua raised his garabato stick over the Babalawo's head.

"You'd never do anything to make me angry, would you?" growled Elegua.

Another squeak, "No."

"And what are you going to do?" asked Elegua, tapping the unhappy Babalawo on the nose with his garabato stick.

"I'm going to pay Orunmila?" asked the Babalawo.

"What was that?" shouted Elegua, shaking the Babalawo back and forth.

"I'm going to pay Orunmila. I'm going to pay Orunmila." stuttered the Babalawo.

He took his money pouch out of his clothes and handed the whole thing over to Orunmila.

"I thought you wanted to cheat Orunmila, but I see that you are a man who pays his debts when he loses." said Elegua and gave the Babalawo a resounding slap on the back. "I'll leave you alone."

Orunmila and Elegua turned and walked away arm in arm. The Babalawo picked himself up from the road and began dusting off his clothes.

"One more thing," said Elegua turning back to the Babalawo.

"Yes?" The Babalawo cringed.

"Since you have forgotten that the oracles are meant to communicate with the Orishas and not to increase the Babalawo's wealth, I'm prohibiting you from using the Dilogun ever again."

Orunmila and Elegua left the Babalawo wailing after them.

In the next town, the Babalawo saw Elegua and his tick standing next to Orunmila. There was no trouble there.
SHINE ON, daughter of a thousand generations, send your light fourth into this tired world...
SHINE ON, mother of a thousand dreams tend to those dreams with strength and compassion...
SHINE ON, woman of a thousand hopes, show everyone the beauty within you - the beauty that comes from knowing who you are

#17 Nombi

Nombi

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Canada-South Africa

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    UmXhosa

Posted 01 September 2008 - 09:35 AM

biggrin.gif Molweni!! First time poster-long time lurker

May I present to you a Xhosa creation tale, This is an extremely shortened and simplied version. Enjoy

The Origins of People. (Imveli yentlanga)

When the earth was young, it was warm, damp and slow moving. Out of the warm dampness a reed began to grow. The sun rose into the midday heat and heated the reed on one side. The side began to dry and burn into stone. On the other side it was still damp and teeming with insects and snakes and fish and crocodiles. Just before midday the sun became so hot it burnt the one side of the reed. The reed continued to grow. It got bigger and bigger from the warmth and the dampness until it burst releasing a large number of people clumped together.

The people unfurled themselves and walked away from the reed and the warm dampness. Now the sun was over the top of the reed. It cracked on all sides. Out came other people who looked smaller and lighter brown in their appearance. From another crack came cattle and other animals. From the top of the reed birds came out, flying into the sky. Many small reeds grew up around the big one. The big reed disappeared into the warm dampness never to be seen again. The reeds around it grew furiously fast to hide the big reed. Even today reeds grow in warm dampness and keep tightly together.

Only the ducks know the secret of the Big Reed but they will not tell. All they will say is "Ka-ka, ka- ka." You may as well kill the duck for it will never say anything else. For people cannot go back to find where they came from. But, from the little reeds people can make things like mats for their huts and for sleeping and baskets for storing food and tinder for making fire. And, the People of the River cannot come out any more. They live there. That is why we call them "Abantu bomlambo."(The People of the River.) Sometimes they call people to be healers because they drown but resurface alive, dressed in full shaman paint and costumes. They did not undergo initiation of months and months but the few minutes they were in the river are like years for other people.

That is why we are all one people "Uhlanga." (People of the Reed). So, when you are to cross a river that is not of your place, greet the People of the River and throw in a stone to knock on their door. You will have luck on your journey, because we are all Uhlanga, People of the Reed.

#18 Diasporan Dawta

Diasporan Dawta

    Advanced Contributor

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 218 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:U.S.
  • Interests:Our people, critical thinking, creativity, the connection between the past, the present and the future... reading, social enterprise

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    X

Posted 24 June 2012 - 06:48 PM

What a wonderful thread! Allow me to share a few. You know that I have to get Anansi in there, but in the meantime, allow me to share "Meat of the Tongue".

"Meat of the Tongue"

Many years ago, in a land faw away, a great sultan lived in a palace with his wife. But the queen was very bored and unhappy. She would wander the pale, moping, yawning, and crying to herself, "What am I going to do? I am so bored and frustrated."

The queen began to lose weight, and her hair began to fall out. Her skin was all pimply and her eyes were bloodshot red. She was, indeed, an unhappy queen.

Now, in the village there lived a poor man whose wife was always very happy. When she worked in her garden, she would sin songs to herself and call out to her neighbors, "Hello, isn't it a beautiful day? Hope you're feeling well." The poor man's wife was a healthy, lovable, kind, and friendly woman. Her skin was nice and taut, and soft like a baby's.

Well, the sultan heard about the poor man's wife and imediately summoned him to the palace.

"Poor Man," said the sultan, "why is it that your qife is always so happy and beautiful and my queen is sad and frustrated? Tell me, poor man, what is your secret?"

"My Sultan," said the poor man, "I have no secret. I merely feed my wife meat of the tongue."

"Meat of the tongue?" whispered the sultan thoughtfully. All around, the advisors also whispered amongst themselves, "Meat of the tongue" So, the sultan summoned the butcher and told him he must sell to him, the sultan, exclusively, all the tongues of every beast in his shop. The butcher smiled and went away. The next day, he sent all the tongues of every beast in his shop to the palace. And these, the royal cook had to prepare in all manner of elegant dishes. There was tongue stew, tongue soup, fillet of tongue, tongue fricasse, barbequed tongue, and roast tongue. There was tongue pie and tongue casserole, tongue salad, and tongue under glass. And this the queen had to eat, sometimes three and four times a day. But she would not gain weight, she remained bored and frustrated, and no matter what the sultan did, he could not make his queen happy.

The sultan became angry and summoned the poor man once again. "Poor Man!! You have deceived me! For this, you must exchange wives."

So, the poor man reluctantly gave up his own wife and took the lean queen home.

As time passed, it became clear that the new queen would not thrive in the palace. She began to grieve and weep. The fine jewels and gold did not interest her. She no longer would sing out hellos, she lost weight, and no matter how hard the sultan tried, he could not satisfy his new queen. Everyone could see that the new queen was very unhappy.

But, alas, when the poor man came home, he would tell his wife of all the things he had seen and done during the day, especially the funny things. The poor man would play his kalimba, his thumb piano, and they would sing songs and laugh and talk until way in the middle of the night. The poor man's wife began to smile. She no longer lost her hair nor weight. Her skin was now taut and soft like that of a baby and she smiled to herself as she worked in her garden, remembering all of the wonderful things her n ew husband had told her the night before. The queen had become very happy.

Now, there came a time when the sultan grew tired of his new wife and summoned his old wife to return to the palace. But when he saw how beautiful she had become, and how hapy she was, the sultan asked, "Wife of mine, what has this poor man done to you?"

And she told him. And it was then he he understood "meat of the tongue."

#19 Diasporan Dawta

Diasporan Dawta

    Advanced Contributor

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 218 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:U.S.
  • Interests:Our people, critical thinking, creativity, the connection between the past, the present and the future... reading, social enterprise

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    X

Posted 08 July 2012 - 05:17 PM

From the Collection of Zora Neale Hurston

"How the Brother was Called to Preach"

"Aw, ah don't pay all dese ole preachers no rabbit-foot:" said Ellis Jones. "Some of 'em is all right but everybody dats up in de pulpit whoopin' and hollerin' ain't called to preach.

"They ain't no different from nobody else," added B. Moseley. They mouth is cut cross ways, ain't it? Well, long as you don't see no man wid they mouth cut up and down, you know they'll all lie jus' like de rest of us."

"Yeah; and hard work in de hot sun done called a many a man to preach," said a woman called Gold for no evident reason. "Ah heard about one man out clearin off some new ground. De sun was so hot till a grindstone melted and run off in de shade to cool off. De man was so tired till he went and sit down on a log. 'Work, work, work! Everywhere Ah go de boss say hurry, de cap'n say run. Ah got a durn good notion not to do nary one. Wisht Ah was one of dese preachers wid a whole lotta folks makin' my support for me. ' He looked back over his shoulder and seen a narrer li'l strip of shade along side of de log, so he got over dere and laid down right close up to de log in de shade and said, 'Now Lawd if you don't pick me up and chunk me on the other side of dis log, Ah know you done called me to preach.

"You know God never picked 'im up, so he went off and tot' everybody dat he was called to preach."

"There's many a one been called just lak dat," Ellis corroborated. "Ah knowed a man dat was called by a mule."

"A mule, Ellis?" said Little Ida.

"All dem b'lieve dat, stand on they head," said Little Ida.

"Yeah, a mule did call a man to Preach. Ah'11 show you how it was done, if you,stand a straightenin'."

"Now, Ellis, don't mislay de truth. Sense us into dis mule callin' business."


Ellis:

"O Lawd, Ah wants to preach. Ah feel lak Ah got a message.If you don called me to preach, gimme a sign."

Just 'bout dat time he heard a voice, "Wanh, uh wanh! Go preach, go preach, go preach!

He went and tol' everybody, but look lak he never could git no big charge . All he ever got called was on some saw mill , half-pint church or some turpentine still. He knocked around lak dat for ten years and then he seen his brother. De big preacher says, "Brother, you don't look like you gittin' holt of much."

"You tellin' dat right, brother. Groceries is ain't dirtied a plate today."

"Whut's de matter? Don't you git no support from your church?"

"Yeah, Ah gits it such as it is, but Ah ain't never pastored no big church. Ah don get called to nothin' but sawmill camps and turpentine stills."

De big preacher reared back and thought a while, then he ast de other one, "is you sure you was called to preach? Maybe you ain't cut out for no preacher."

"Oh, yeah," he told him. "Ah know Ah been called to de ministry. A voice spoke and tol'me so."

"Well, seem lak if God called you He is mighty slow in puttin' yo' foot on de ladder.If Ah was you Ah'd go back and ast 'im again.

So de po' man went on back to de prayin' ground agin and got down on his knees. But there wasn't no big woods like it used to be. It has been all cleared off. He prayed and said, "Oh, Lawd, right here on dis spot ten years ago Ah ast you if Ah was called to preach and a voice tole me to go preach. Since dat time Ah been strugglin' in Yo' moral vineyard, but Ah ain't gathered no grapes. Now, if you really called me to preach Christ and Him crucified, please gimme another sign."

Sho nuff, jus' as soon as he said dat, de voice said "Wanh-uh! Go preach! Go preach! Go preach!"

De man jumped up and says, "Ah knowed Ah been called. Dat's de same voice. Dis time Ah'm goin ter ast Him where must Ah go preach."

By dat time de voice come agin and he looked 'way off and seen a mule in de plantation lot wid his head all stuck out to bray agin, and he said, "Unh hunh, youse de very son of a gun dat called me to preach befo'. "

So he went on off and got a job plowin'. Dat's whut he was called to do in de first place. TOP

These was two bothers and 'one of 'em was a big Preacher and had good collections every Sunday. He didn't pastor nothin' but big charges. De other brother decided he wanted to preach so he went way down in de swamp behind a big plantation to de place they call de prayin' ground, and got down on his knees. ?

Armetta said, "A many one been called to de plough and they run off and got up in de pulpit. Ah wish dese mules knowed how to take a pair of plow-lines and go to de church and ketch some of 'em like they go to de lot with a bridle and ketch mules. "

[center]

Ellis: Ah knowed one preacher dat was called to preach at one of dese split-off churches. De members had done split off from a big church because they was all mean and couldn't git along wid nobody.

Dis preacher was a good man, but de congregation was so tough he couldn't make a convert in'a whole year. So he sent and invited another preacher to come and conduct a revival meeting for him. De man he ast to come was a powerful hard preacher wid a good strainin' voice. He was known to get converts.

Well, he come and preached at dis split-off for two whole weeks. De people would all turn out to church and jus' set dere and look at de man up dere strainin' his lungs out nobody would give de man no encouragement by sayin' "Amen," and not a soul bowed down.

It was a narrer church wid one winder and dat was in pulpit and de door was in de front end. Dey had a mean ole sexton wid a wooden leg. So de last night of de protracted meetin' de preacher come to church wid his grip sack in his hand and went on up in de pulpit. When he got up to preach he says, "Brother Sexton, dis bein' de last night of de meetin' Ah wants you to lock de do' and bring me de key. Ah want everybody to stay and hear whut At got to say.

De sexton brought him de key and he took his tex and went to preachin'. He preached and he reared and pitched but nobody said "Amen" and nobody bowed down. So 'way after while he stooped down and opened his suitsatchel and out wid his .44 Special. "Now," he said, "you rounders and brick-bats --yeah, you women, Ah'm talkin' you. If you ain't a whole brick, den you must be a bat and gamblers and 'leven-card layers. Ah done preached to you for two whole weeks and not one of you has said 'Amen,' and nobody has bowed down."

He thowed de gun on 'em. "And now Ah say bow down!" And they beginned to bow all over dat church.

De sexton looked at his wooden leg and figgered he couldn't bow because his leg was cut off above de knee. S ohe ast, "Me too, Elder?"

"Yeah, you too, you peg-leg son of a gun. You bow down too. "

Therefo' dat sexton bent dat wooden leg and bowed down. De preacher fired a couple of shots over they heads and stepped out de window and went on 'bout his busines

But he skeered dem people so bad till they all rushed to one side of de church tryin' to git out and carried dat church buildin' twenty-eight miles befo' they thought to turn it loose.



Anancy & Common Sense

Anancy & Common Sense


Wance apan a time Breda Anancy mek up im mind seh im gwine callect all a de camman sense inna de wurl. Im was tinking dat he would be de smartest smaddy in de wurl ef im do dis. So Anancy traveled all ova de wurl collecting camman sense. Im go to big countries an likkle ones. Im go to primary schools and universities. Im go to govament offices and businesses. Im go people house and dem work place.
Im tek all de zillions camman sense he had collected fram around the wurl and put it a big calabash. Im tek de calabash wid im to im backyard and climbed a big gwangu tree. His plan was to store it at de tap of the tree for safety-keeping. Nobady woulda get to it but Anancy.
To mek sure it was safe Anancy tie the calabash to de front of his bady. Dis slow down im progress up de tree to a slow crawl. Im did look very clumsy a-go up de tree wid be-caw the calabash dida hamper im.
As im was slowing going up toward de top a de tree a likkle girl below called out to im. Anancy, mek you nuh tie the calabash pon you back insteada in front of yuh. It will git up de tree much fasta and ez-a.
Anancy was bex be-cah de likkle girl show im up for not thinking. She had more good sense dan him he thought. He called out to her “Mi did tink me collected all the camman sense fram all ova de wurl”
He was so angry dat im fling the calabash to the to the groung and it bust. All of the camman sense im did callect fly back to all ova de wurl.
An dat's how you and I manage to have just a likkle common sense for we-self tideh.
Jack Mandora, me tell yuh no lie!!!




2 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 2 guests, 0 anonymous users