Jump to content


Photo

The Post Racial Debate: Should we trust the Police?


  • Please log in to reply
82 replies to this topic

#21 Twang

Twang

    Family

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1200 posts

Posted 23 July 2012 - 05:54 PM

The average speng is just as dangerous as a Manchurian Candidate in so far as his/her mind and heart has been indoctrinated by this country's educational system to believe in this system and therefore would have no qualms in acting in protecting, supporting and dying for this supremacist system that has disfranchised them for centuries. In actuality, they are the same. You would have to seriously brain-washed to wear the police uniform and swear allegiance to the Queen. Or worse, join the army, fight in its neo-colonial wars and die for this system.


I cant disagree... but my point is most fools that do join will have a racist agenda anyway... most Africans that join are somewhat misguided hence the need for the creation of the Black police association.

#22 Toyin

Toyin

    Ligali Member

  • Moderator
  • 1532 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:London
  • Interests:Pan Africanism & Human Rights
    Female Empowerment
    African Literature, Film and Arts
    Conscious Music
    Sci-Fi

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    Yoruba (Nigeria)

Posted 23 July 2012 - 07:14 PM

You would have to seriously brain-washed to wear the police uniform and swear allegiance to the Queen. Or worse, join the army, fight in its neo-colonial wars and die for this system


Agreed.

Especially if you consider how they have historically treated 'commonwealth' soldiers after they have risked life and limb for a few coins...



Commonwealth soldiers face deportation

Commonwealth soldiers who have risked their lives for Britain are facing deportation and destitution under new rules which deny them British citizenship.

By Andrew Gilligan, 21 Jul 2012


Lance-Corporal Bale Baleiwai, a Fijian, served for 13 years in the Army, including operational tours to Afghanistan, Iraq, Bosnia and Northern Ireland, winning four medals, exemplary reports from his commanding officers and even being used in recruitment adverts.

He has a British wife and children. But he has been refused citizenship, banned from working, and faces imminent removal – because he once accepted a commanding officer’s punishment after getting into a fight with another soldier.

The punishment was imposed at a military summary hearing in the CO’s office lasting ten minutes. L/Cpl Baleiwai had no legal representation.

No witnesses were called and he was not told that five other soldiers were prepared to testify that he had acted in self-defence.

However, for immigration purposes, a military summary punishment counts the same as a criminal conviction in a civilian court, disqualifying the applicant from citizenship.

Full Article: http://www.telegraph...eportation.html


Good enough to die for the country but not good enough to live in it.

Stockholm syndrome is an apt description.

#23 Diasporan Dawta

Diasporan Dawta

    Advanced Contributor

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 218 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:U.S.
  • Interests:Our people, critical thinking, creativity, the connection between the past, the present and the future... reading, social enterprise

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    X

Posted 25 July 2012 - 05:07 AM

This is just a question that I would like to ask you all out of curiosity. When police officers are killed where you live, is a big deal made out of it?

Here, from the officers' deaths to their funerals, a very big deal is made of it.

Toyin said:

The funny thing is that most of us want the police but only if they do they can job without abusing their power.

Indeed. It's just that that's precisely the reason that we do not want them. Then again though, they don't abuse their power, because the state bestows upon them to target kill, beat, and frame Africans. We can call it... :-)... law de facto for blacko. You know though, I remember this ultra conservative law oriented television show that used to come on when I was younger and I remember very clearly these words that would be said at the beginning and the end of the show: "...because NO ONE is above the law". I clearly remember thinking then that when you ARE the law, you don't "need" to try to be above it. No wonder that of one of the many names that the police are known by around here that "the law" is one. The law = the state...and "NO ONE is above the law."



Oh, and as a reminder that our family in the good ole U.S of A aren't getting any love. Meet one now ex cop, Michael Daragjati. This law enforcement officer felt it cool to boast about frying Africans (but using the n word) and then go into a court with an African judge and explain to him that the n word is ok to use when describing naughty Africans.

Strange how police recruitment standards when it comes to employing and retaining racists (covert and otherwise) are never criticised.


Seems that these "standards" are standard.

Posted Image

A "silent protest" was held last month to protest "stop and frisk".

Source: NY Times
Thousands March Silently to Protest Stop-and-Frisk Policies


In a slow, somber procession, several thousand demonstrators conducted a silent march on Sunday down Fifth Avenue to protest the New York Police Department’s stop-and-frisk policies, which the organizers say single out minority groups and create an atmosphere of martial law for the city’s black and Latino residents.


Stop-and-frisk is a political tool, victimizing one group of people so another group feels protected,” Mr. Jealous said. “It’s humiliating hundreds of thousands of people.”


Police officers stopped nearly 700,000 people last year, 87 percent of them black or Latino. Of those stopped, more than half were also frisked.


Two and a half hours after it began, the peaceful, disciplined march ended in mild disarray. As many marchers dispersed, police officers at 77th Street and Fifth Avenue began pushing a crowd that defied orders to leave the intersection, shoving some to the ground and forcing the protesters to a sidewalk, where they were corralled behind metal barricades. After protesters pushed back, the officers used an orange net to clear the sidewalk, and appeared to arrest at least three people.


“In this city of so much hustle and bustle and clamor, sometimes the loudest thing you can do is move together in silence,” he said.
But a few dozen voiced their disagreement with the strategy at the march’s end, chanting: “We can’t be silent. We got to fight back.”



#24 Toyin

Toyin

    Ligali Member

  • Moderator
  • 1532 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:London
  • Interests:Pan Africanism & Human Rights
    Female Empowerment
    African Literature, Film and Arts
    Conscious Music
    Sci-Fi

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    Yoruba (Nigeria)

Posted 25 July 2012 - 05:43 PM

This is just a question that I would like to ask you all out of curiosity. When police officers are killed where you live, is a big deal made out of it?

Here, from the officers' deaths to their funerals, a very big deal is made of it.


We have a similar situation although it is very rare. You will find that the media promotes the downed officer as a 'hero' irrespective of the full facts but the public is pretty nonchalant over the whole affair. Apart from when someone makes the police a deliberate target and then there is a silent excitement at the thought of someone going all Raid Redemption/Assault Precinct 13 on them.

http://www.guardian....ok-page-deleted

Toyin said:
I remember very clearly these words that would be said at the beginning and the end of the show: "...because NO ONE is above the law". I clearly remember thinking then that when you ARE the law, you don't "need" to try to be above it. No wonder that of one of the many names that the police are known by around here that "the law" is one. The law = the state...and "NO ONE is above the law."


Good point, but unless I went toi sleep and woke up in a world where Judge Dredd was real police officers are not the law, they are servants of the law and representatives of the state. It would be good if they (and we) remembered that when they attempt to flex their authority.


A "silent protest" was held last month to protest "stop and frisk".


With all due respect isn't this why we are still in the same position now as when MLK spoke about non-violent protest being the ONLY way? I'm not advocating rioting but a 'silent' protest? what next a 'virtual' sit in? For protest to be effective it has to disrupt normal activities in order to clearly present a message of protest.

I love our people and totally am with them against these 'stop and frisk' which we have over here in the UK, but let me tell you what the nett result of that protest will be.

Zero.

No change, but not because no-one is listening, but because we didn't make our voice (and actions) heard loud enough. :sad:

#25 Diasporan Dawta

Diasporan Dawta

    Advanced Contributor

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 218 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:U.S.
  • Interests:Our people, critical thinking, creativity, the connection between the past, the present and the future... reading, social enterprise

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    X

Posted 25 July 2012 - 07:55 PM

That's something.

When a police officer here is killled, they go on as if a president has been murdered It is as if a solemn parade of self-righteous patriotism has to be put on. News coverage about it becomes non-stop from start to finish.. There is much outrage about the "cop-killer" (They don't seem to know about the killer-cops.) Too many of us are out there- right alongside the people that the police force is TRULY here to serve and protect-looking foolish and out of place like a green stripe on a zebra's back. (Anything for some of us to feel as if there is "unity" among us, even if only for the duration of the funeral procession.) As I've said, it is as if a president has been assassinated and buried. Not at all to say that I feel that any president that America has had deserves such attention, but I know you understand my comparison.

Of course they're not the law, just do-boys and do-girls for the law, but that is why they (and too many of us) feel that they can just do whatever they want to do. In my humble opinion, "the state" has only as much 'power' as the people allow it to have. I do, however, feel that they have the Little Louie ("I AM the STATE!") no one-is-above-this complex and that we the people support it whether we know it or not.

Exactly, exactly, exactly. That is why I placed "silent protest" in quotations. Shuffering and shmiling. Same thing, different day. If ithe definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and and over yet expecting different results, then we are out of our very minds. It's comparable to STILL trying to appeal to the conscience of those who have for centuries upon centuries shown themselves to have no conscience.

It is so that there was more to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and the civil rights struggle than most of us will hear for the yearly black history lesson in February, yet it is also so that his message of non-violence is one which the white 'power' structure wishes to remain very vividly in our minds and not the message from the likes of those such as Malcolm X and the liberation struggle, because they do not want us to remember that we have options.

We are using the wrong stick. Oh wait, we aren't even using a stick; we are using "silence". Perhaps silence was the only option as we were far too hoarse from singing "We Shall Overcome" for all of these years.

#26 The Freelance Scientist

The Freelance Scientist

    Family

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2358 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Gambia
  • Interests:Education, Politics, Current Affairs, Dialogue with the community and others.

    I like going to the gym, playing football and travelling the world. I'm at university at the moment.

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    Mandinka

Posted 26 July 2012 - 06:28 AM

In recent years, the police have been responsible (and I use that term very lightly) for the deaths of Jean Charles De Menenzes, Mark duggan, Smiley Culture, Ian Tomlinson. We remember Cynthia Jarrett. And there's Blair Peach from the past... and many other deaths in police custody. Has there ever been a police conviction regarding any of these deaths? And what does that tell you?
[i]The Freelance Scientist: He Is The Eternal Student.

#27 Diasporan Dawta

Diasporan Dawta

    Advanced Contributor

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 218 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:U.S.
  • Interests:Our people, critical thinking, creativity, the connection between the past, the present and the future... reading, social enterprise

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    X

Posted 26 July 2012 - 03:58 PM

In recent years, the police have been responsible (and I use that term very lightly) for the deaths of Jean Charles De Menenzes, Mark duggan, Smiley Culture, Ian Tomlinson. We remember Cynthia Jarrett. And there's Blair Peach from the past... and many other deaths in police custody. Has there ever been a police conviction regarding any of these deaths? And what does that tell you?


A whole lot indeed, Brother.

#28 Twang

Twang

    Family

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1200 posts

Posted 26 July 2012 - 04:59 PM

In recent years, the police have been responsible (and I use that term very lightly) for the deaths of Jean Charles De Menenzes, Mark duggan, Smiley Culture, Ian Tomlinson. We remember Cynthia Jarrett. And there's Blair Peach from the past... and many other deaths in police custody. Has there ever been a police conviction regarding any of these deaths? And what does that tell you?


It tells u that they have a license to kill and always Have.

#29 Toyin

Toyin

    Ligali Member

  • Moderator
  • 1532 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:London
  • Interests:Pan Africanism & Human Rights
    Female Empowerment
    African Literature, Film and Arts
    Conscious Music
    Sci-Fi

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    Yoruba (Nigeria)

Posted 30 July 2012 - 01:10 PM

Ex-police officer Rachel Hewitt jailed for cancer lie

A former North Yorkshire Police officer who took time off work after falsely claiming her daughter had cancer has been jailed for 18 months.
Posted Image
Rachel Hewitt, 39, of Ash Grove, South Elmsall, West Yorkshire, admitted fraud and misconduct in public office earlier this year at Hull Crown Court.
Hewitt said she had to miss work because her daughter was in intensive care and needed chemotherapy.
In fact, the court heard, her daughter was taking part in show jumping events.

Full Story: http://www.bbc.co.uk...kshire-19047644



#30 MarcusGarveyLives

MarcusGarveyLives

    Family

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3805 posts

Posted 13 August 2012 - 05:47 PM

"Humberside Police is to be investigated over the way it handled allegations of sexual assault by a police community support officer (PCSO).

In January, a woman claimed that the on-duty officer engaged in a sex act when he visited her home ..."


Source: Humberside Police investigated over sex assault claim, BBC Online, 1 August 2012 (click for more)

"A female member of police staff who was sexually assaulted in a bar by a detective has said she will never go out with another group of police officers again because she does not trust them.

The woman spoke out as Mike Johnson, 37, of the Humberside police force, was sentenced to a 12-month community order and curfew after admitting sexually assaulting her last year ..."


Source: Humberside police: ex-detective sentenced for sex assault on colleague: Former policeman given curfew and community order in force's third sexual offences case, The Guardian (online), 9 August 2012 (click for more)



Posted Image


(Note: You can read more about the "work" of Humberside Police here)

#31 MarcusGarveyLives

MarcusGarveyLives

    Family

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3805 posts

Posted 17 September 2012 - 10:10 AM

Meet former Scotland Yard "detective", 30 year-old Brother Ryan Coleman-Farrow, from St Leonards-on-Sea, Hastings, East Sussex ...






Posted Image



... yesterday Brother Coleman-Farrow pleaded guilty to 13 counts of misconduct in a public office at Southwark Crown Court. He failed to investigate rape and sexual assault cases and falsified entries on a police computer system. The 13 counts to which he pleaded guilty to relate to 10 rape cases and three cases of sexual assault. The offences he should have investigated were committed between January 2007 and September 2010, while he was an officer at Kingston-upon-Thames, south-west London, working for Scotland Yard's specialist Sapphire unit. The cases involved 12 complainants and 11 suspects, and in "almost all" the 13 cases no proceedings had resulted, prosecutor Mark Heywood QC said. An IPCC commission spokesman said that Brother Coleman-Farrow had made false or misleading crime report entries 32 times, falsified a witness statement and twice claimed to have interviewed a rape suspect when he had not done so.



Posted Image



Brother Coleman-Farrow was bailed and is due to be sentenced on 11 October 2012.



#32 MarcusGarveyLives

MarcusGarveyLives

    Family

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3805 posts

Posted 20 September 2012 - 05:37 PM

The Post Racial Debate: Should we trust the Police?


This may help you:

One crime victim sexually assaulted by police every fortnight (click for more)

Sexual predators in police 'must be rooted out: 'IPCC says sexual predators in the police service must be treated as corrupt officers and rooted out by their senior supervisors (click for more)

Revealed: the scale of sexual abuse by police officers: Exclusive: Guardian investigation finds sexual predators in police are abusing their power to target victims of crime (click for more)

#33 MarcusGarveyLives

MarcusGarveyLives

    Family

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3805 posts

Posted 29 September 2012 - 10:25 PM

The Post Racial Debate: Should we trust the Police?


This may help you:

Police figures show corruption cases against 49 Met officers: Freedom of information request reveals 258 officers were suspended between 2009-2011, with 33 dismissed (click for more)

#34 Toyin

Toyin

    Ligali Member

  • Moderator
  • 1532 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:London
  • Interests:Pan Africanism & Human Rights
    Female Empowerment
    African Literature, Film and Arts
    Conscious Music
    Sci-Fi

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    Yoruba (Nigeria)

Posted 05 October 2012 - 05:47 PM

'Shameful' chief constable will keep his pension

A chief constable has been sacked for his “shameful” dishonesty, but will be allowed to keep his full pension.

Posted Image

By Martin Beckford, Home Affairs Editor
2:19PM BST 05 Oct 2012



Sean Price was found guilty of gross misconduct after he lied about trying to get a job with Cleveland Police for the daughter of a contact, and then tried to bully a member of staff into joining in his cover-up.


He became the first head of a police force in England and Wales to be dismissed without notice for 35 years, even before 18 further charges of misconduct could be considered against him. Other chief constables under investigation have either resigned or taken early retirement.


The 55-year-old also remains on bail as part of a detailed corruption investigation into Cleveland Police Authority, while the service watchdog is looking into claims that he and his wife, who is also a senior officer, failed to report that she had been arrested for being drunk and disorderly.


But because Mr Price, who was paid £113,317 a year, has already spent 30 years in policing, he will be able to claim his full pension.

His departure was confirmed just a day after another chief constable, Sir Norman Bettison of West Yorkshire, announced he would retire in the wake of allegations about his role in criticising Liverpool fans’ behaviour at the Hillsborough disaster.

Full Article: http://www.telegraph...is-pension.html



#35 MarcusGarveyLives

MarcusGarveyLives

    Family

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3805 posts

Posted 05 October 2012 - 09:10 PM

The Post Racial Debate: Should we trust the Police?


Rewind to 14 September 2012 ...

"A crisis is brewing at the top of English policing after another chief constable was suspended on suspicion of serious misconduct ..."

Cumbria police chief Stuart Hyde suspended over misconduct claims (click for more)


Posted Image

Photograph: David Sillitoe


Stuart Hyde, the temporary chief of Cumbria police, has been suspended on suspicion of serious misconduct.



#36 Toyin

Toyin

    Ligali Member

  • Moderator
  • 1532 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:London
  • Interests:Pan Africanism & Human Rights
    Female Empowerment
    African Literature, Film and Arts
    Conscious Music
    Sci-Fi

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    Yoruba (Nigeria)

Posted 18 October 2012 - 12:06 PM

Police Taser blind man mistaking his white stick for a samurai sword

The IPPC is investigating an incident in Chorley, where an innocent person was struck by a 50,000-volt stun gun

Posted Image

An innocent blind man was shot in the back with a 50,000-volt Taser by police after they mistook his white stick for a samurai sword.
Colin Farmer, 61, was hit after reports of a man walking through Chorley, Lancashire, early on Friday evening, with a sword. He said he initially thought he was being attacked by hooligans when he was struck by the Taser.
The matter is being investigated by the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) after Farmer made a complaint to the force.
Farmer, who used to run an architects' practice, was on his way to meet friends at 5.45pm and was walking in Peter Street near a restaurant. "I was just walking along and I heard some men shouting really angrily and thought I'm going to get mugged. I didn't know any police were here.
"The Taser hit me in the back and it started sending all these thousands of volts through me and I was terrified. I mean I had two strokes already caused by stress. I dropped the stick involuntarily and I collapsed on the floor face down."
He added: "I was shaking and I thought 'I'm going to have another stroke any second and this one is going to kill me. I'm being killed. I'm being killed'."
Farmer, who has suffered two strokes, the most recent requiring two months in hospital in March, was fearful he would suffer another stroke.
"I walk at a snail's pace. They could have walked past me, driven past me in a van or said 'drop your weapon'."
Lancashire Police apologised to Farmer for the "traumatic experience" but confirmed last night that the officer who fired the Taser has not been suspended and remains on duty.

Full article: http://www.guardian....blind-man-stick


And yet there are still those that support the arming of police with tasers and increasing their stop and search powers claiming "If you haven't done anything wrong you have nothing to frightened off"...

#37 Black Lion

Black Lion

    Advanced Contributor

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 267 posts

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    Caribbean

Posted 19 October 2012 - 01:33 PM

.... a good response to that one is, 'well then give me your bank account details, PIN number and address'.

It is odd that officers are arrested and tried for crimes, had the opinion that like the military they were held to a diffrent court process than would civilians, applied this to why they get away with murder on so many occasions but it looks like this isn't the case... that a civilian can die in extremely suspisious circumstances in their company as protectors and efforts are made so that they aren't tried but if they were to commit fraud its an offence and must be taken seriously... am I wrong for looking for logic in this madness?

Perhaps its more sinister, that the state is happy to have a force that the population fears.

At times its a bit odd looking at and casting judgement on events in the diaspora while things at home disintergrate... the events in Jamaica in regards to the Dudus case and the Trivoli massacre, the recent massacre of Nigerians by state forces, the Kenyan soilder who seems to have taken a page from American military insanity, murdering several Somali civilians... the list continues.

Am at a loss over which way to look at times.

Edited by Black Lion, 19 October 2012 - 01:35 PM.


#38 MarcusGarveyLives

MarcusGarveyLives

    Family

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3805 posts

Posted 20 October 2012 - 11:45 AM

...So I ask the question not can the police be trusted but should they be?


This is the Late Gordon Fraser, 49 year old Assistant Chief Constable of Leicestershire Police ...



Posted Image


... yesteday he was struck and killed by the 10.22a.m. train from Paddington to Hereford at Aston Magna, Moreton-in-Marsh. Fraser and his wife Teresa (also a serving police officer) appeared in court in July charged with perverting the course of justice over a speeding incident in Scotland. It is understood the couple claimed she was the driver of a speeding car in Scotland in September 2011, when it was alleged her husband was actually at the wheel. Fraser had been suspended from duty since December 2010, pending a separate investigation being carried out by Merseyside Police. They confirmed earlier this year that they were investigating Fraser in connection with allegations of misconduct and fraud. British Transport Police said it was investigating the circumstances surrounding the incident and would be preparing a report for the coroner. His death is not being treated as suspicious. Fraser and his wife were due to appear at St Albans Crown Court on Monday (22 october 2012).


Posted Image


Crooked cop takes the easy way out?



#39 MarcusGarveyLives

MarcusGarveyLives

    Family

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3805 posts

Posted 24 October 2012 - 03:26 PM

Hillsborough police chief Sir Norman Bettison resigns after claims he 'boasted about smearing Liverpool fans' (click for more)


Posted Image


Another one bites the dust.



#40 Toyin

Toyin

    Ligali Member

  • Moderator
  • 1532 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:London
  • Interests:Pan Africanism & Human Rights
    Female Empowerment
    African Literature, Film and Arts
    Conscious Music
    Sci-Fi

  • Are you African: Y
  • Cultural Heritage:
    Yoruba (Nigeria)

Posted 26 October 2012 - 06:43 PM

Sadly some of them still escape justice despite incontrovertible evidence...



PC Alex MacFarlane cleared of racist abuse after second trial without verdict

Judge clears police officer who was recorded calling a man under arrest 'a [n word]' after jury fails to reach decision

A police officer who was secretly recorded calling a young black man under arrest a "[n word]" has been cleared by a judge of criminal racist abuse, after a second jury was unable to reach a verdict.
Judge Michael Gledhill QC discharged Alex MacFarlane, a constable based at Forest Gate police station in east London, after the jury could not reach a decision. The first trial, last week, had the same outcome, and prosecutors said they would not take the unusual step of seeking a third trial.

Source: http://www.guardian....d?newsfeed=true






1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users