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Reggae Star Smiley Culture dies in Police Raid


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#1 Positive

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 09:23 AM

The police watchdog is investigating the death of the British reggae star Smiley Culture during a Metropolitan police raid.

The 48-year-old singer and MC, whose real name was David Emmanuel, died on Tuesday from a stab wound sustained as officers visited his house in Warlingham, Surrey to make an arrest.

Although it is unclear how Emmanuel was injured, investigators are understood to be looking into whether the wound was self-inflicted.

A Scotland Yard spokesman said: "As part of an ongoing operation, officers from the Metropolitan police service's serious and organised crime command attended a residential address in east Surrey to carry out an arrest warrant.

"While they were at the address, an incident occurred during which a 48-year-old man died. Officers from Surrey police attended the incident and it has been formally referred to the Independent Police Complaints Commission."

The IPCC confirmed that it was looking into the death.

Mike Franklin, IPCC commissioner for the south east, said: "We will be looking into the planning of the arrest, the way in which it was carried out and the actions of all the officers who were present at the time of the incident."

Emmanuel had appeared before magistrates charged with conspiracy to supply cocaine last September.

He shot to fame in the 1980s with songs such as Cockney Translation — an explanation of rhyming slang — and Police Officer, an autobiographical song of how he was caught in possession of cannabis but let off when the officer recognised him as a reggae artist.

Although he made a cameo appearance in the David Bowie film Absolute Beginners in 1986, he went on to have little mainstream exposure.

In an interview with the Guardian last year, he spoke of his time in the music business and his musical legacy.

"Police Officer was a true story – the police used to take my weed," he said. "It was better than being arrested and I made that into a hit. With Cockney Translation, I was a black man talking cockney. I integrated cultures even though I didn't understand it at the time. I was invited to meet the Queen, who said she listened to my records in the palace.

"Although I paved the way for people like the Streets and Dizzee Rascal, I left the music business because I wasn't rich."

Ricky Belgrave, the chairman of the British Association of Static Systems, said Emmanuel's death was a sad loss for British reggae.

"He was a lively personality and one of the first wave of UK talent like Maxi Priest, Tippa Irie and Aswad, to cross over to the mainstream," he said.

"His tracks, like Police Office and Cockney Translation are well remembered and are still played at the Notting Hill carnival. I think there's a direct line between the UK talent of the 80s and MCs today and he did pave the way for that. We offer our condolences to his family at this tragic time."

#2 Toyin

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 04:45 PM

@Positive

Thanks for sharing this tragic news with us.

The circumstances behind this passing/murder is so suspicious its untrue.

Its incidents like this that makes me wish i had the resources to put together a Ligali forensic team that automatically investigates these kind of issues on our behalf.

As such we have to wait for the IPCC to perform its usual exoneration of the police. :(

#3 Twang

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 08:55 PM

I wonder ?!?

Edited by Twang, 16 March 2011 - 09:01 PM.


#4 Twang

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 09:10 PM

Damn Nate Dogg to ?


R.I.P to both brothers.

#5 OSIRUS

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Posted 17 March 2011 - 05:47 PM

R.I.P Brother smiley your tunes gave me and my brothers and sisters nuff joak in the 80s.
this is one from him.



May his family get some justice THIS TIME! for yet ANOTHER! death at the hands of the babylon brute beasts.
Some of us my not like Hip Hop but it can be the cnn of the streets. Nate dog R.I.P Brother
this is my favorite from him.


Edited by OSIRUS, 17 March 2011 - 05:50 PM.


#6 MarcusGarveyLives

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Posted 18 March 2011 - 12:18 AM

Smiley Culture Family Press Conference: 17 March 2011 (click for more)

#7 Toyin

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Posted 18 March 2011 - 08:59 PM

A political commentator named Nelson Abbey has posed several question on this matter that require answering;

The two that stand out are;

  • Why would experienced police officers let a person caught in a drug-related raid get up and stroll into the kitchen in order to “make a cup of tea”?
  • Did David really stab himself in the heart so hard that it penetrated right through his body and came through the other side?

Source: http://londonscene.standard.co.uk/

#8 OSIRUS

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 01:10 PM

Public Meeting Brixton Town Hall 24th March 2011




This was my favorite tune by brother smiley back in the day.
Hotep!


Edited by OSIRUS, 27 March 2011 - 01:13 PM.


#9 Toyin

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 09:49 PM

What i am about to write is not intended to be seen as an 'attack' on any individuals in particular but my spirit calls that I release what is in my heart.

It hurts me that this is the 30th anniversary of the New Cross Fire and yet our community is not dealing with this (or that) situation properly.

I am dismayed at our current vision of leadership that seem only capable of supporting the exploitation of these tragedies without implementing investigatory procedures to secure answers and eventually justice.

The solution to dealing with both the Smiley Culture tragedy and the New Cross Fire injustice is so obvious yet we seem to continuously chose the easy option of more talk without action.

The action i refer to before anyone asks, is not violence, but it is 'boring', methodical, analytical work by a team of committed and capable workers supported by community donations to work exclusively on our behalf.

Writing letters, meeting with witnesses, officers, investigators, coroners, politicians all with the explicit consent of the families.

It involves our community radio stations growing up and working together in order to collectively dedicate time to keep this and other matters in our collective consciousness through daily news bulletins at the very least as well as well produced and researched talk shows, where presenters young and old, male and female avoid inviting and then engaging with rants, ranting guests, or start to abuse, confuse and generally talk down to listeners.

This requires leadership drawn from those in our community with a solid work ethic.

I'll leave it there, just felt it needed to be said.

#10 Twang

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 11:31 PM

Amen bro.


The truth is were just not ready.

#11 cabindaleader

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Posted 29 March 2011 - 12:44 PM

We most certainly are ready but the contributors here need to translate word into actions. Our community gives hundreds of millions of pounds to Faith Organisations given sufficent inspiration we will invest in secular worth while initiatives which protects our long term interest.

Cabindaleader

#12 Twang

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Posted 29 March 2011 - 02:35 PM

We most certainly are ready but the contributors here need to translate word into actions. Our community gives hundreds of millions of pounds to Faith Organisations given sufficent inspiration we will invest in secular worth while initiatives which protects our long term interest.

Cabindaleader



Please elaborate...

#13 cabindaleader

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Posted 29 March 2011 - 03:24 PM

@ Twang
Consider our African centric Saturday schools (prefer to not call names) who steadfastly refuse to accept government financial support. African centred community radio stations and indeed the Ligali organisation are excellent examples and there are many, many, many more our unsung heroes and heroines quietly making the difference. WE ARE MORE THAN READY, IT IS HAPPENING!

Cabindaleader

#14 Twang

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Posted 29 March 2011 - 04:16 PM

@ Twang
Consider our African centric Saturday schools (prefer to not call names) who steadfastly refuse to accept government financial support. African centred community radio stations and indeed the Ligali organisation are excellent examples and there are many, many, many more our unsung heroes and heroines quietly making the difference. WE ARE MORE THAN READY, IT IS HAPPENING!

Cabindaleader


Our contributors here are not the problem its those that contribute to faiths and beliefs alien to our own... this is why we are not ready bcoz sadly they are the majority. In the scheme of things Grass roots organisations have minuscule support and are all trying to pull from the same tiny little pot.

#15 cabindaleader

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Posted 29 March 2011 - 04:29 PM

@Twang
The pot as you call it is vast you simply fail to perceive the potential. African are the smartest people around. We will commit wholeheartedly if we believe the outcome will be benefit the individual and or wider African communities. I have read a few of your posts, moan, moan, moan, uninspiring, uninspiring, uninspiring! If your are an African you must understand the African psyche if not ask the Churches, Mosque or Galaxy Radio community radio stations of this word how they successfully engage the African masses.

The World is Our Oyster!

Cabindaleader

#16 Toyin

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Posted 29 March 2011 - 05:55 PM

@ Cabindaleader

Thank you for your kind words about Ligali but as i announced last year, I am tired, overworked and to be honest... disappointed. The campaigning days of this organisation are over, I may continue to produce and publish works behind the scenes, but upfront I now only serve only as a curator and administrator of cultural media resources that I hope continue to be of use to our people. Its time for the next generation to pick up the baton whereas i as an elder (almost) will willingly offer guidance, protection and support.

We most certainly are ready but the contributors here need to translate word into actions.


Perhaps it is important that we do not confuse potential with readiness.

We most certainly have the potential to overcome our challenges, but it is widely optimistic to say enough of us are ready (as in organised) to do so.

With regards to your comments about the contributors here, I can only state that the Ligali forums are a online space for reasoning. A university of Pan Africanism if you'd like, some contributors are likely to be involved in 'action' others like myself have dedicated our lives to 'action' and to avoid burning out need to recuperate, others are just beginning their journey... if offered sufficient, coherent (and competent) leadership i suspect they will come.

We most certainly are ready but the contributors here need to translate word into actions. Our community gives hundreds of millions of pounds to Faith Organisations given sufficent inspiration we will invest in secular worth while initiatives which protects our long term interest.

Cabindaleader


And as Twang suggested, therein lies the problem. Despite these millions of pounds resting in our leaders pockets clearly something isnt working if they still need convincing and inspiration to invest in 'secular worth while initiatives which protects our long term interest'.

Is that what 'faith' teaches them to do.

Nothing?

Should not 'faith' organisations be proactive in these instances, not submissive. Is the only thing they bring to the table - prayer and money? If so then let me tell you that is not enough. Should they not mobilise to be the change we wish to see instead of waiting to see if bodies with a history like the IPCC will bring change to the issue of deaths in custody?

Martin Luther King and Rosa Parkes were arrested and jailed over their convictions, they were not violent but both offered progressive leadership. When was the last time you heard any African minister in this country take a political stand in defence of our community? When was the last time you saw any African minister openly announce they were setting up a permanent taskforce to investigate and solve the myriad of issues in our community? Which mainstream politician from our community has lent their name to this campaign in order to secure us access to media space to reach the masses of our people?

Don't get me wrong, this is not just a matter for leadership in faith organisations, but also pan Africanists, 'black' nationalists, socialists, and 'black' British activists.

I feel sick to see how this issue is being exploited for personal gain, i wont name names and yes it is plural.

This is not an issue of money, this is an issue of political maturity and spiritual conviction and as i said, we have the potential, both you and Twang are correct in identifying existing groups attempting to achieve positive change, but when it comes to leadership and work ethic, there are few brave enough to risk progressive change instead of crowd pleasing rhetorical blame.

I do not wish to divert this thread from its original topic so i will leave it there.

#17 MarcusGarveyLives

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Posted 29 March 2011 - 07:12 PM

I do not wish to divert this thread from its original topic so i will leave it there.

Other, more recent contributors don't seem to share your wish.

Posted Image

I wonder why.



#18 Twang

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Posted 30 March 2011 - 12:10 PM

@Twang
The pot as you call it is vast you simply fail to perceive the potential. African are the smartest people around. We will commit wholeheartedly if we believe the outcome will be benefit the individual and or wider African communities. I have read a few of your posts, moan, moan, moan, uninspiring, uninspiring, uninspiring! If your are an African you must understand the African psyche if not ask the Churches, Mosque or Galaxy Radio community radio stations of this word how they successfully engage the African masses.

The World is Our Oyster!

Cabindaleader


Your post is a typical example of why we as people are just not ready yet as u perfectly display the inability to have constructive dialogue without throwing insults whenever need be... isn't it a wonder why people with such closed minds deicide to put themselves in position of power in order to serve the community but then always end coming up short ?!? Sadly this type of mentality is the reality and would go some way to explain why we are not going anywhere. Dream on.

#19 cabindaleader

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Posted 31 March 2011 - 01:17 PM

@ Toyin

I spoke earlier about understanding the African psyche through which we live our lives. I will admit to some frustration that amongst our most talented activist they display a complete lack of imagination when dealing with our own people. The racist most certainly have learnt these lessons about us to enable their propaganda campaigns to have a disproportionate impact upon some within our community. I will not recount the conditions which heighten some within our community sensitivity to anti African racist propaganda or recount socio-psychology, socio-economic or socio-spiritual results because I choose not to clarify their effectiveness or not, for common-sense strategic reasons?

To proceed with this very public dialogue I should stress it is not my style to use references peoples, places, events or dates to thereby I protect the integrity and longevity of evidence drawn upon rather I invite the inquisitive to engage in research to substantiate (or not) observations, hypothesis or my affirmations.

We have heard it said many times before “the revolution will not be televised” therefore it will occur without the prying eyes of anti African racist whose influence permeate throughout Euro Asia, Indo-Asia, Sino-Asia and beyond. Their corporate collective interest is best served if they slow down our inevitable socio-recuperation. Our re-emergence will not simply place the African continent and Africans as trading equals with our evolutionary offspring’s but transforms the lives of all humanity through our social philosophy and much, much more.

There are good readily accessible examples of socially oppressed peoples emerging from antagonistic physical /mental conditions. Each example possesses unique features but the rejuvenative cognitive processes are notable by their similarities. This process has been underway for hundred of years – it is inevitable – the anti African racist controllers of multination corporations are equally anti human species their only loyalty is to the accumulation of money through which influence and or direct control power over our lives and humanities. Our intuition sense, we all live within a penal complex therefore our reactions unless we have closed down our intellect we will always be guarded this is particularly true of diasporic Africans.

You might ask the question did “Smiley Culture” understand the wider context when he recorded his original hit song “police officer” I venture to suggest, he did not. If he did his subsequent life measured by positive influence over his peers is an indication?

Toyin, I suggest meditation, meditation and more even more meditation! You already have all the answers. Imagine again what it was like when you swam within our boundless energy source; remember from whom love was the unmistakeable! Remember feeling love from those whose names you did not even know; hold true to your vision for yourself, the rest is inevitable………

Cabindaleader

#20 cabindaleader

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Posted 31 March 2011 - 01:51 PM

@Twang
I want to offer my profuse apology to you. I see my response to your earlier post was not appropriate, I humbly beg your forgiveness. But I must insist upon one modification to your language to avoid misinterpretation. I request that you use qualifying terms such as “some” or “a few” when describing African collective actions. Clearly you consider yourself to possess good collectivist instincts therefore other must possess your qualities and I can assure you this is correct.

Since my last bout of post to this website my energy, enthusiasm intellectual capacity has increased leaps and bounds because I have observed clear and unmistakeable evidence of correct social evolution cognitive dialectic occurring amongst my people. I have said on many occasions that the African knowledge matrix is vast beyond words, complex beyond usual contemporary understanding, and visionary with the power to astound and surprise!

If what I describe has not been your experience then I hope you will permit me to invite readers to make direct contact with you via other means if evidence is what is required to reinvigorate a respected warrior.

Again I want to reiterate, I did not intend to offend or diminish your previous posts.

The future is ours to shape.

Cabindaleader




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