A Pan African Human Rights Organisation challenging the misrepresentation of African people, culture and history in the British media.

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Mon 14 January 2013

Nubiart Diary - Pan-Afrikan News

 

A different perspective on the Afrikan world

Submitted By: Kubara Zamani

PAN-AFRIKAN NEWS PRESS RELEASES

~ UNITED NATIONS ‘DECADE FOR PEOPLE OF AFRIKAN DESCENT’ LAUNCHED IN BARBADOS
Report by Elder Rev. Buddy Larrier. E-mail: iypadbarbados@gmail.com

This year 2013 starts the United Nations (UN) Decade for People of Afrikan Descent (DPAD) 2013-2023 with the theme Recognition, Justice, Development. The UN has also invited recommendations for an annual ‘International Day for People of Afrikan Descent’ that captures the experiences of Afrikan people. The 12th October has been put forward as a most appropriate date, as it was on this date in 1492 that Christopher Columbus made landfall in the Caribbean. That historic event became the gateway to the Transatlantic Trade in Afrikans and Colonialism of their “New World”. These proposals by the UN is recognition that after 520 years (1492-2012) of brutality, injustice, exploitation and crimes against humanity perpetuated against People of Afrikan Descent there must be a conscious and deliberate effort at Reparations, Restoration and Restitution. The designated UN’s decade is a call for Afrikan people on the continent and in the Diaspora to unite to make this demand irresistible.

To this end the Decade for People of Afrikan Descent should be formally launched by the end of February the traditional ‘Black History Month’. This initiative can be taken by Governments, Religious Groups or Non-governmental Organisation (NGOs) acting together where possible. For example, in Barbados the launch on Tuesday, January 1, at Oistins, Christ Church was carried out by NGOs supported by Government Agencies including a Cabinet Minister.

It is fitting that Barbados should be in the forefront in this initiative because during colonial times Barbados was used by European slave masters for their own purpose in a most effected way. Barbados’ as a slave society began in 1627 with the arrival of the first English settlers. The island never changed colonial hands and slavery existed from then until 1838. During this period laws and practices were introduced to make life more and more harsh for the enslaved persons. In 1661 there was introduced a Slave Code that legally classified Afrikan persons as Chattel Slaves commodities. Methods for breaking the spirit of the Afrikan person were tested in Barbados and copied in other colonial territories including the Southern States of America.

The formal launch of the ‘Decade for People of Afrikan Descent’ is only the beginning. The UN’s ‘Working Group of Experts on People of Afrikan Descent’ and the Afrikan Union has devised programmes of action for Reparations, Restoration and Restitution, which we are invited to implement in our own countries. Barbados has since joined the international movement on Reparations by establishing a Reparations Task Force. Should Recognition, Justice and Development be attained by People of Afrikan Descent during the decade 2013-2023 the world would stand a good chance of becoming a peaceful place for ALL humankind. These programmes are available, goggle UN website, the Global African Diaspora Summit webpage and Barbados Task Force on Reparations.


~ WORLD AFRICAN DIASPORA UNION (WADU) - 1/5/2013

Center for Culture 176-03 Jamaica Ave Jamaica, NY 11432-5503
Contact: 718-523-3312 http://www.wadupam.org/

Immediate Release
Minister P.D. Menelik Harris

Farika, WADU Vice President Advances Ambassador Thompson Mission in Ethiopia

NYC – The World African Diaspora Union (WADU) Vice President Nana Yaa Farika Berhane is enroute to Ethiopia with the mission of promoting Pan Africanism and the first WADU Ambassador Dudley Thompson Pan African tribute. The WADU mission and tribute will advance the WADU and the African Union Diaspora Task Team (AUDiTT) May 2012 Ambassador Dudley Thompson Resolution calling for a union government of Africa. A powerful federated Africa was the central work of the greatest of our ancestral leaders, such as those like the Honorable Marcus Garvey, Emperor Haile Selassie, Dr. John H. Clarke and President Kwame Nkrumah, for the security and advancement of all Africans.

The mission to Ethiopia will also include convening a January 19, 2013 birthday tribute to WADU late President and the “Legendary” Pan Africanist Ambassador Dudley Thompson, to pull together African Diaspora and African leaders to forge forward for a united states of Africa. The specific objectives are also to encourage the African Union (AU) to promote issues such as African Diaspora citizenship, Diaspora representation in the AU, economic partnerships, reparations, African education and for Africa to develop its own security measures to protect Africa and all Africans from the major and ongoing threats against African people, after centuries of enslavement and colonialism.

The WADU mission to Ethiopia will also coincide with the AU Summit January 21-28, 2013 with the theme of “Pan Africanism and the African Renaissance.” Some of the key leaders planned to be in Ethiopia representing the African Diaspora are Dr. Leonard Jeffries, Dr. Julius Garvey, Nana Yaa Farika Berhane, Dr. Molefi Asante, Minister Akbar Muhammad, Dr. Norma Jackson, and Minister Ari Merretazon. African Union representatives and other Pan African leaders will join WADU in Ethiopia from various parts of the world at Africa’s Capitol in Addis Ababa for the tribute and AU Summit. The above and other leaders heading to Ethiopia have being directly influenced by the work of those like late Dr. John Henrik Clarke, Kwame Ture and Cheik Anta Diop and will also help to set a unified agenda for the OAU 50th anniversary and action plan in May 2013.

WADU is one of the foremost Pan African Diaspora organizations with a coalition of leaders and an umbrella of organizations representing the global African Diaspora. The African Diaspora participation is consistent with the African Union constitutive act declaring that it shall “invite and encourage the full participation of the African Diaspora as an important part of our continent, in the building of the African Union.” Consequently, WADU has incorporated some of the most influential leaders of the African Diaspora in readiness and are advancing with Pan Africanism for a peaceful, prosperous and powerful African people in the 21st century.

Nana Farika, the new WADU vice president was greatly influenced by Baba Dudley Thompson, Dr. Walter Rodney, the Rastafari movement and the Maroons of Jamaica. She was an official Diaspora representative at the 6th Pan African Congress (PAC) sponsored by the OAU in Tanzania. She later worked with Dr. John Henrik Clarke on the 7th PAC and was a co-founder of WADU with other major Pan Africanists.

WADU is urging every African to support or participate in unifying and empowering all Africans in the world. For more information on WADU or our mission to Ethiopia, please contact Baba John Watusi Branch at our WADU 6th region main office at 718-523-3312 or our website at WADUPAM.ORG.


~ ESTABLISH A WADU IN YOUR STATE NOW IN PREPARATION FOR COORDINATED ACTIONS‏

World African Diaspora Union (WADU) 1/11/2013

Center for Culture 176-03 Jamaica Ave Jamaica, NY 11432-5503
Contact: 718-523-3312 http://www.wadupam.org/

Immediate Release
Minister P.D. Menelik Harris

WADU President to Give State of the Pan African World Message in Addis Ababa

NYC – Dr. Leonard Jeffries, President of the World African Diaspora Union (WADU) will make the State of the Pan African World Message in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia on January 19, 2013. The President will be in Ethiopia for the first WADU Ambassador Dudley Thompson Pan African Mission and Memorial Tribute to promote the push for a union government of Africa. A powerful federated Africa was the central work of the greatest of our ancestral leaders, such as those like the Honorable Marcus Garvey, Emperor Haile Selassie, Dr. John H. Clarke and President Kwame Nkrumah, for the security and economic advancement of all Africans.

The WADU President’s message to the African world in Africa’s capitol on the birthday of WADU late President and the “Legendary” Pan Africanist Ambassador Dudley Thompson is to continue the Pan African movement agenda to unify the African world forward for a united states of Africa. The WADU mission to Ethiopia will also coincide with the African Union (AU) Summit January 21-28, 2013 with the theme of “Pan Africanism and the African Renaissance.” The annual summit of African leaders is to decide on major issues affecting Africa and African people across the world.

WADU specific objectives during the Summit are to encourage the AU to promote issues such as African Diaspora citizenship, Diaspora representation in the AU, economic partnerships, reparations, repatriation, African education, and for Africa to develop its own security measures to protect Africa and all Africans from the major and ongoing threats against African people, after centuries of enslavement and colonialism.

Before becoming the President of WADU, Dr. Jeffries served with key leaders of the Pan African Movement. His inspiration to serve as a WADU leader is especially driven by his decades of work with the late Dr. John Henrik Clarke, who called for an ‘African world community’. Dr. Jeffries Presidency comes after serving as the vice president of WADU under Baba Dudley since 2007. More importantly, he has been serving at the cutting-edge as a peoples’ scholar-activist on African history, culture and heritage.

In 2007, Dr. Dudley Thompson met with other great Pan Africanists in Jamaica to establish WADU. Called the “Living Legend” and an “Eminent” leader by African leaders over the years, Dr. Dudley is a Panamanian born Jamaican leader who played a critical role in the liberation of both the African Diaspora and Africa, including pushing strongly for the full rights of Zimbabwe, Angola, Kenya, Tanzania, Cuba and South Africa. Ambassador Thompson was also a champion of the reparations movement and worked with the late President-elect MK Abiola of Nigeria leading to the Abuja Declaration. Baba Dudley Thompson’s instruction to WADU leaders was to ensure that WADU establish itself with Pan Africanists worthy of representing the African Diaspora, as the sixth region of Africa.

Some other key leaders planned to be in Ethiopia with Dr. Leonard Jeffries to represent the African Diaspora are those such as Dr. Julius Garvey, Nana Yaa Farika Berhane, Dr. Molefi Asante, Minister Akbar Muhammad, Dr. Norma Jackson, and Minister Ari Merretazon. African Union representatives and other Pan African leaders will join WADU for the memorial tribute and the AU Summit in Ethiopia from various parts of the world. The leaders will also help to set a unified agenda for the OAU 50th anniversary and action plan in May 2013.

WADU is one of the foremost Pan African Diaspora organizations with a coalition of leaders and an umbrella of organizations representing the global African Diaspora. The African Diaspora participation is consistent with the African Union constitutive act declaring that it shall “invite and encourage the full participation of the African Diaspora as an important part of our continent, in the building of the African Union.” Consequently, WADU has incorporated some of the most influential leaders of the African Diaspora in readiness and are advancing with Pan Africanism for a peaceful, prosperous and powerful African people in the 21st century.

WADU is urging every African to support or participate in unifying and empowering all Africans in the world. For more information on WADU or our mission to Ethiopia, please contact Baba John Watusi Branch at our WADU 6th region main office at 718-523-3312 or our website at WADUPAM.ORG.

~ AFRICAN WOMEN AND YOUTH CONFERENCE IN MAPUTO, MOZAMBIQUE, MARCH 9, 2013

WE CALL ON

ALL AFRICAN WOMEN AND YOUTH ORGANIZATIONS

ALL WOMEN’S AND YOUTH ORGANIZATIONS OF CHURCHES

ALL THE WOMEN AND YOUTH OF STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

EVERY AFRICAN WOMAN AND YOUTH WHO WANTS TO MAKE A SERIOUS CONTRIBUTION TO THE UNIFICATION OF AFRICAN WOMEN AND AFRICAN PEOPLE

TO PARTICIPATE IN THE AFRICAN WOMEN’S AND YOUTH CONFERENCE

BUILDING AFRICAN WOMEN’S AND YOUTH MOVEMENTS AND FORMING INTERNATIONAL SISTERHOOD

Saturday, 9 March 2013 10 AM – 5 PM

HOSTING ORGANIZATION MOZAMBICAN WOMEN’S ORGANIZATION

OMM CONFERENCE CENTRE

MAPUTO, MOZAMBIQUE

FREE

Theme: THE UNIFICATION OF AFRICA THROUGH THE EMANCIPATION AND LEADERSHIP OF WOMEN

AFRICAN WOMEN’S AND YOUTH MOVEMENTS ARE NECESSARY IN ORDER TO EDUCATE, MOBILIZE, AND ORGANIZE THE LARGEST NUMBER OF AFRICAN WOMEN AND YOUTH AS POSSIBLE

Panel Topics Include:
The Necessity of Organization for the Unification of Africa*
The Importance of Women’s Leadership in the Unification of Africa *
The Role of Youth in the Unification of Africa*
Solidarity with Women and Youth of the World and World Unity*
Men for the Emancipation of Women *
The Relationship between the Unification of Africa and Self-Reliance

For participation or other information please contact: African Women’s Charity Organization, PO Box 23074 Oakland, CA 94623-0074 USA Phone: 415 789-7360. E-mail: forafricanwomen@att.net

*This Conference is FREE so that the cost of the conference itself won’t be the reason for anyone not attending. **We do not sponsor transportation or accommodations.

***Please wear white as a symbol of unity and solidarity.

Why this Conference
We are in the process of building powerful African Women’s and Youth Movements throughout the world that will connect all African women and youth, inside and outside of Africa. This is a very important part of the African independence movement. An African Women’s and Youth movement is necessary to educate, mobilize, and organize the largest number of African Women and Youth as possible. Our vision includes collectively solving our problems to obtain proper childcare, housing, collective kitchens, transportation, healthcare, clean drinking water for all and employment/skills, etc. We must build a strong infrastructure in Africa and we must be tightly organized inside and outside of Africa. In order to be in the African Women’s and Youth Movements you must study two books, Class Struggle in Africa by Kwame Nkrumah and Women in Society by Sekou Toure. The study must be with a group of people.

The African Women’s Charity Organization is proud to announce that we are organizing an African Women’s and Youth Conference in Maputo, Mozambique on Saturday 9 March 2013 at 10:00am – 5:00pm. This will be the 26th conference that we have organized since we started having conferences the year 2000; thirteen of the conferences have been in the United States and this will be the thirteenth conference in Africa; Senegal, Guinea, Ghana, Mali, Gambia, and Rwanda. The theme of this conference is “The Unification of Africa through the Emancipation and Leadership of Women”

On Independence Day for Ghana, March 6, 1957 President Nkrumah declared that the independence of Ghana was meaningless unless it was connected to the unification of Africa. President Nkrumah came to the conclusion that the unification of Africa will not be a reality if organized from the top down, it must be organized from the bottom up. To organize African society from the bottom up means to organize the women of Africa.

President Sekou Toure has said, “The African woman has participated everywhere in Africa in a conscious, constant and often decisive manner, in the anti-colonialist struggle and in the fight for national liberation.”… “Our women organizations have a political character which imposes on each woman a conscious and constant militancy, a high degree of political consciousness, a real and continued participation in all fields of activities.

Women’s struggle for liberation must be seen as a part of the more general struggle against capitalism, and never as an isolated struggle directed against men.” “If we want to strike at the root of evil it is the mode of production that must be aimed at. We must first of all commit ourselves to the building of a society whose mode of production excludes any exploitation.”

Women have been in the leadership of humanity for 98% of the time that humanity has been on earth in a mode of production called communalism. Under communalism, for example, all land and means of production belonged to the community. There was people’s ownership. Labor was the need and habit of all and there was no exploitation.

“The most serious ideological blindness, it must be emphasized, lies in reducing the emancipation of the woman solely to the female element; presenting woman’s emancipation as a problem particular to women is a monumental error.” This is why we have organized within the African Women’s Charity Organization an organization called “Men for the Emancipation of Women.” We understand that the emancipation of women is necessary for the emancipation of men. Organization is the weapon of the oppressed. Every person must join an organization and the strategy must be the organizing of organizations. It is our goal to become so organized that we can do in one day what previously took 20 years. The radicalization of the revolution is the unification of Africa through the emancipation and leadership of women.

We can not be defeated if women come to love the work for the unification of Africa like she loves her family; and there is nothing more positive for her family than the unification of Africa. Women are the primary educators for the boys and the girls in society and the consciousness that she will gain from working for the unification of Africa will come out through her children’s love for Africa, and the children’s determination to use their education to build a strong Africa. In Africa we have everything that we need for the liberation and unification of Africa. Confidence and organization is what is now necessary.


FORTHCOMING NUBIART PROFILES
NUBIART: Focus on arts, business, education, health, political developments and the media.


JAN PROMOS

~ ‘SANTIMAN’ - The Creole Choir of Cuba [Real World Records – Released 4 Feb 2013] This second album from The Creole Choir of Cuba’s develops on their canon of freedom songs passed down through generations of Haitian emigrants in Cuba. The choir expertly displays faultless harmonies, pulsating musical accompaniment and tight arrangements.

While many of the tracks on the album are traditional one of the original tunes ‘Pou Ki Ayiti Kriye’ (‘Why Does Haiti Cry?’) was penned in response to the Jan 2010 earthquake. Given their ancestral links to Haiti it comes as no surprise that the Choir have been involved in relief support and humanitarian work on the island. ‘Pale, Pale’ is a Haitian protest song by Boukan Ginen (an offshoot of Haitian musical vodouistes Boukman Eksperyans) and is given the extended treatment at over 10 minutes long.

A quartet of the songs - ‘Preludio’, ‘Llegada’, ‘Balada de Annaise’ and ‘Jubileo’- are part of a cycle inspired by ‘Gouverners de La Rosee’ (‘Masters of the Dew’), a book by Haitian writer and politician Jacques Roumain set in 19th century Haiti.

‘Fey Oh Di Nou’ is a powerful, soulful invocation to the healing power of plants. In a similar vein ‘Simbi’ tells of the Haitian freshwater goddess prevented from attending a rites ceremony. Social issues come to the fore on ‘Tripot’, an uptempo Konpa rhythm which tells of the community rejection of a village gossip and ‘Marasa Elu’ about an orphan begging for help. On the lighter side ‘Camina Como Chencha’ about a girl with bandy legs(!) has a real swinging Cuban guaracha flair that puts it up there with songs from any of the Cuban greats while ‘Boullando’ (‘Ball On My Back’) is a cautionary tale on the same subject.

From the sleevenotes: “Following the recording, original group member Dalio Arce Vital passed away, but he will always be with us, with his broad smile and eternal willingness to help anyone. He was proud to contribute to the spread of the music of his two beloved countries: Cuba and Haiti.”


NUBIART LIBRARY – JAN MEDIA
We will only review books we have read and DVDs we have seen and that are available at reasonable prices online or in shops or libraries. However, given the nature and current state of Afrikan publishing and production there may be books and films on this list that are worth the extra effort to track down.



~ ‘HOME: SOCIAL ESSAYS’ - Amiri Baraka [Akashic Books. ISBN: 13-978-1-933354-67-5]

“You only have freedom of speech if you don’t say anything…They give you freedom of the press if you own a press…Most of the rappers you hear are the ones that won’t make any difference.” – Amiri Baraka, Black Beats, London, 7 Oct 2012

Amiri Baraka’s long out of print ‘Home’ launched AkashiClassics: Renegade Reprint Series and followed the publication of his short story collection ‘Tales of the Out & the Gone’ in 2007. This collection of social and political essays from 1960-65 is an autobiographical slice of his political development. It kicks off with ‘Cuba Libre’ detailing an early visit to see The Cuban Revolution in practice. But the poet brings it closer to ‘home’ in the US during the days of the Birmingham bombings, Robert Williams’ Monroe Defense Movement, the Harlem riots and the assassination of Malcolm X: “Malcolm said many times that when you speak about revolution you’re talking about land – changing the ownership or usership of some specific land which you think is yours.” (p269)

In ‘What Does Non-Violence Mean?’ he dissects the whole concept and relevance of that term and concept to the Civil Rights movement as it is used, abused, misused and misappropriated: “The “Free World” is merely that part of the world in which the white man is free to do as he wants with the rest of the people there. And has ruled this way since the Elizabethans.” (p165)

‘Home’ powerfully reveals why Amiri Baraka was named Poet Laureate of New Jersey from 2002-2004 by the New Jersey Commission on Humanities. His commitment to social, political and artistic integrity has been continuously prevalent throughout his work such as when he wrote in ‘The Revolutionary Theatre’: “All men live in the world, and the world ought to be a place for them to live.” (p239)




Nubiart Diary


~ INSTITUTE OF COMMONWEALTH STUDIES AND THE BLACK & ASIAN STUDIES ASSOCIATION PRESENT HANNAH MURRAY SPEAKING ON ‘A WALL OF ANTI-SLAVERY FIRE - FREDERICK DOUGLASS IN BRITAIN’. Former enslaved African-American Frederick Douglass visited Britain in the1840’s popularising anti-slavery, creating a sensation across the country and enhancing the transatlantic connections between abolitionists. On Tues 15 Jan at 6-7.30pm in Rm G26, Senate House, University of London, Russell Square, London WC1. E-mail: Marika.Sherwood@sas.ac.uk)

~ CENTERPRISE UPDATE. The campaign to keep Centerprise Open continues despite the seizure of our premises by Hackney Council. You are invited to a public meeting to discuss the next stage of the struggle to discuss: Update on eviction by Hackney Council; Update on legal action against Hackney Council; Centerprise Defence Fund; and a temporary new home for Centerprise. On Wed 16 Jan at 6-8pm at Trinity Centre, Beechwood Road, Dalston, London, E8 3DY. Sign the online petition at: http://www.petitionbuzz.com/petitions/savecenterprise E-mail: info@centerprise.org.uk Web: www.centerprise.org.uk

~ CAS BOOK LAUNCH: ‘GONDAR’S CHILD: SONGS, HONOR & IDENTITY AMONG ETHIOPIAN JEWS IN ISRAEL’.‏ In Ethiopia, Ethiopian Jews were attributed with dishonourable status because of their perceived dissociation from the land. Yet they derived their self-ascribed honour from their link with Israel, expressed through their name: Beta Israel (“House of Israel”). In the Israeli context, the Beta Israel’s association with Ethiopia constitutes both a limiting factor to their honour, leading to a concern among Beta Israel with the image of their ethnic group, and constitutes also a medium for the pursuit of honour. It is in these terms, and in its concern to progress, that the Beta Israel Band of Porachat HaTikva (Blossoming Hope) is viewed as a microcosm of Beta Israel society in Israel. As such, the Band is portrayed as expressive of a shift taking place in Beta Israel identity in Israel in terms of gender and generational relationships, and of the discursiveness between values in tune with their traditional village identity and those they associate with the “decadent” Ethiopian town.

Among the traditional Ethiopian song-types which form the repertoire of the Band those of reminiscence and relating to their migration to Israel provide the focus for various perspectives on this migration, from the fulfillment of Biblical prophecy, to the painful memories of a land of birth and history, where family members were left behind. The author Dr Marilyn Herman has carried out in-depth research relating to Ethiopian Jewish music and society, and to Jewish music and society in Yemen in relation to gender and ethnicity. Chaired by Dr Shihan de Silva (Institute of Commonwealth Studies, University of London). On Thurs 17 Jan at 5-6.30pm in Rm 4421, College Buildings, SOAS, University of London, Thornhaugh Square, London, WC2. E-mail: ab17@soas.ac.uk


~ AFRICAN ODYSSEYS PRESENT ‘THE PIROGUE’. Dir: Moussa Toure. Dedicated to the 5000-or-so Africans who have died trying to cross to Europe in the last decade, this film tells the story of a retired Senegalese fisherman who is persuaded to captain a wooden fishing boat, a pirogue, on a dangerous journey in search of a better life. Initially hesitant, Laye agrees to go, driven by aspirations for his own family. The trip gradually descends into disaster as the pirogue’s human cargo fight for survival against the treacherous conditions of the Atlantic Ocean. On Sat 19 Jan at 2pm at BFI Southbank, Belvedere Road, London, SE1. Adm: £5. Web: www.bfi.org.uk


~ AJAMU PRESENT ‘MUSIC AND SOCIAL CHANGE’. An opportunity to understand how the music industry operates. Are the lyrics influencing the streets or are the streets influencing the music?; Can you make money from conscious lyrics?; Can you earn money without being famous, getting naked or bling-ed up?; What are music’s possibilities to mobilize young people for positive personal and social change? With Kwaku (www.britishblackmusic.com) Special guest performances from: Cyclonious (http://cyclonious.bandcamp.com/); Frenglish Connexion (http://www.frenglishconnexion.com/); Silas Zephania (https://soundcloud.com/silaszephania/silas-zephania-birth-place); Soneni & The Soul (http://soneniandthesoul.co.uk/) Open mic competition for under 21s (£20 cash prize for winner). On Sat 19 Jan at 6pm at Chestnuts Centre (Upstairs), Chestnuts Park, 280 St Ann’s Road, London, N15 5BN.


~ BLACK HISTORY STUDIES IN ASSOCIATION WITH THE NEW BLACK FILM COLLECTIVE PRESENTS ‘HIDDEN COLORS 2: THE TRIUMPH OF MELANIN’. Dir: Tariq Nasheed. Featuring Booker T Coleman, James Small, KRS-One, Michelle Alexander, Phil Valentine, Runoko Rashidi, Tariq Nasheed, Tony Browder and Umar Johnson this follow-up to the critically acclaimed 2011 documentary about the untold history of people of Afrikan and aboriginal descent covers topics such as: The Global Afrikan Presence; The Science of Melanin; The truth about the Prison Industrial Complex; How thriving Afrikan economic communities were undermined in America; and the hidden truth about Native Americans. On Mon 21 Jan at 8pm at Stratford Picturehouse East London, Salway Road, London, E15 1BX. Adm: £6.50. Box Office: 0871 902 5740.

~ CENTRE OF SOUTH ASIAN STUDIES

- ‘Encounters, Cultural Flows and Hybridity in the Indian Ocean’. European intervention in Indian Ocean trade commencing in the late fifteenth century resulted in unpredictable effects on the cultures of the people in the region. Encounters of the Portuguese, the first westerners to engage in commerce with South Asians are studied through historical sources. But these sources are insufficient and other means must be explored. This paper reconsiders the Portuguese encounter in the region taking into account material culture. Dr Shihan de Silva is a Senior Fellow at the Institute of Commonwealth Studies (University of London). She has a PhD (Linguistics), an MSc (Finance) and a BSc Honours (Economics) from the University of London. She is the author of Tagus to Taprobane (Tisara Prakasakayo, Colombo, Sri Lanka, 2001), An Anthology of Indo-Portuguese Verse (Edwin Mellen Press, UK, 2001), Indo-Portuguese of Ceylon (Athena Publications, London, 2001), The Portuguese in the East: A Cultural History of a Maritime Trading Empire (I B Tauris, London, 2008), African Identity in Asia (Markus Wiener Publishers: Princeton, New Jersey, 2008) and The African Diaspora in Asian Trade Routes and Cultural Memories (Edwin Mellen Press, UK, 2010). On Mon 21 Jan at 5.30-7pm at College Buildings, Rm 4421, SOAS, University of London, Thornhaugh Square, London, WC2. Tel: 020 7898 4892 / 3. E-mail: centres@soas.ac.uk


- “We’re Indian and African”: Sidis of India. Lecture by Dr Shihan de Silva on the diverse circumstances of Afrikan migration to India, their roles and achievements, their current status, issues of identity and belonging. Chair: Dr David Taylor (SOAS & Institute of Commonwealth Studies). The Lecture will be followed by the screening of two documentary films produced by Beheroze Shroff from the University of California, Irvine, USA).

“We’re Indian and African”: Voices of the Sidis (22 mins). This film explores the lives of the Sidis in Gujarat. Sidi men and women speak about the challenges they face as caretakers of the shrine of their ancestral saint Bava Gor. The Sidis also discuss their sacred Goma-Dhammal dance performed for devotees and spectators. The film also gives a glimpse into the spiritual legacy of the Sidis through the Parsi devotees of Bava Gor in Bombay.

Voices of the Sidis: Ancestral Links (26 mins). In this engaging portrait of an urban Sidi family in Bombay (Maharashtra), Babubhai traces his ancestry to Zanzibar. He also reminisces about his work as a stuntman in Bollywood films. Babubhai’s wife, Fatimaben, narrates her grandmother’s work in a Hindu royal court. Their daughter, Heena, speaks about issues of identity in contemporary India. On Fri 22 Feb at 5.30-7pm in Rm G51, SOAS, University of London, Thornhaugh Square, London, WC2. Tel: 020 7898 4892 / 3. E-mail: centres@soas.ac.uk

~ SIGNPOST & RITE DIREKSHON AGM. Features a book launch by Dr Lez Henry of ‘Carry-Beyond Reflections: An Audiography by Lezlee Lyrix’. On Thurs 24 Jan at 6.30-10.30pm at Malcolm X Community Centre, City Road, Bristol, BS2 8YH. E-mail: director@projectsignpost.org.uk or info@nubeyond.com Web: www.drlez.co.uk


~ AKOBEN AWARDS FREE HALF-DAY MUSIC INDUSTRY COURSES. For north-west London–based budding music industry moguls aged 18+ an opportunity to turn dreams into reality with two free music industry courses covering: a) Music Industry Overview (11am-1.30pm), b) Copyright & Contracts
(2.30pm-5pm) plus c) End of course presentation / networking (6.30pm-8.30pm). On Fri 25 Jan at Unity Centre, 103 Church Road, London, NW10 9EG. To book or for more info check: www.bizmusic.eventbrite.com

~ THE AFRICA CENTRE PRESENT ‘WHAT A WONDERFUL WORLD’. Dir: Faouzi Bensaïdi (Morocco 2006). Souad is a prostitute whose best friend is Kenza, a tough traffic cop. Kamel is a stony–eyed contract killer who receives his hit orders via the Internet; he is also Souad’s favourite customer. When Kenza falls in love with Kamel, the two begin a bizarre courtship doomed by their disparate lines of work, and a persistent cyber–snooping hacker who stumbles upon the site where Kamel receives his murderous contracts. Moroccan actor–director Faouzi Bensaïdi promiscuously stylish film is a new vision of an old culture, unveiling an uncommon Casablanca caught in a world wide web of associations and consequences. On Sun 27 Jan at 2.30pm at The Africa Centre, 38 King Street, London, WC2E 8JT. Adm: £3. Bookings: http://whatawonderfulworld.eventbrite.com/# Web: www.africacentre.org.uk

~ THE AFRICA CENTRE PRESENT ‘IN CONVERSATION: SOUTH AFRICA, THE NEW ANC LEADERS AND AN UNCERTAIN FUTURE’. Gillian Slovo is a South African born novelist, playwright and memoirist. She has written many books including ‘Ice Road’ which was shortlisted for the Orange Prize, and ‘Red Dust’, an account of the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which was made into a film by Tom Hooper, starring Hilary Sw**k and Chiwetel Ejiofor. Slovo’s memoir, ‘Every Secret Thing: My Family, My Country’, is an account of her childhood in South Africa and her parents Joe Slovo and Ruth First - major figures in the anti-apartheid struggle who lived perilous lives of exile and occasional imprisonment, which culminated in her mother’s murder by South African forces. In 2011, she created the play ‘The Riots’ from spoken evidence which appraises events during the 2011 England riots. She is the President of the English Centre of International PEN. Fiona Forde author of the best-selling ‘An Inconvenient Youth: Julius Malema and the ‘new’ ANC’ will talk through the changing face of the former liberation movement as it governs modern-day South Africa. On Mon 28 Jan at 7.30-9.30pm at The Africa Centre, 38 King Street, London, WC2E 8JT. Adm: £3. Web: www.africacentre.org.uk

~ THE RUNNYMEDE RACE DEBATE: DO RACISTS HAVE A RIGHT TO BE HEARD? London’s Olympic summer projected an image of a nation at ease with itself, united in diversity. And yet a slew of recent incidents on the football field, twitter and beyond revealed a more sinister picture, belying any easy assumption that we are living in a post-racial age. In light of such developments, we will be asking a panel of high profile public figures, including Sunder Katwala (British Future) and Catherine Fieschi (Counterpoint) “do racists have a right to be heard?” The debate will be chaired by Runnymede director, Rob Berkeley. On Wed 30 Jan at 6.30pm at The RSA, 8 John Adam St, London, WC2N 6EZ.


~ TIM REID’S (LEGACY MEDIA INSTITUTE) FILMMAKERS WORKSHOP. On 4-16 Feb at BFI Southbank, Belvedere Rd, London, SE1. Adm: £100 Advanced Registration, £150 after Jan 18. Web: www.bfi.org.uk

~ NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF BLACK SATURDAY SCHOOLS AND BLACK HISTORY WALKS PRESENT THE QUEEN NZINGA LECTURE - ‘BLACK WOMEN IN ACADEMIA: SUCCESS, SECRETS AND COPING STRATEGIES’. This second of twelve Queen Nzinga lectures features three generations of African women who have achieved PhDs speaking about their experiences as well as a Q and A with all three to expand on their revelations. Speakers include: Dr Ama Biney who has lectured at Middlesex University and Birkbeck College, University of London, as well as in the further education sector in the UK for over 15 years and is a trustee of the Tajudeen Abdul-Raheem Educational Trust; Dr Michelle Asantewa is an English and Creative Writing lecturer at London Metropolitan University. She has also curated several Afrikan history film events at the university and spoke on women’s resistance in 18th century literature at the first Queen Nzinga Lecture last year; and Nathalie Montlouis, PhD, who has just completed her doctorate in cultural studies and is now editing a book on Afrikan culture and western stereotypes. She is the Programme Manager for the French / Caribbean dance group Ziloka and is the co-creator of ‘Performing Black Bodies in White Spaces’. On Sat 23 Feb at 6-9pm in Rm B36, Birkbeck University, Malet St, London, WC1 E 7HX. Adm: Free / Donations, Web: www.nabss.org.uk and www.blackhistorywalks.co.uk

Contact: Kubara Zamani, Afrikan Quest International, PO Box 35165, London, SE5 8WU. Tel: 07811 494 969. E-mail: afrikanquest@hotmail.com Web: www.southwark.tv/quest/aqhome.asp


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