https://mobirise.com/

Campaign success gives free access to slavery records

By The Ligali Organisation | Fri 14 November 2008

A campaign to get free community access to the register of enslaved Africans in the Caribbean has borne fruit after the intervention of petitioner Martin Booth, community worker Arthur Torrington and over 9000 supporters.


Several months ago the Prime Minister rejected a petition to “Give African descendants free access to slavery records” arguing that the original versions of these records are available for anyone to go and see, free of charge, at The National Archives’ reading rooms in Kew.

In response, Arthur Torrington, secretary of the Equiano Society and the Windrush Foundation wrote a letter to the government stating; “Free online access may be regarded as a form of reparation for the cruelty and injustice by the British in the era of African enslavement. Saying that the government considered that free access “would incur significant cost” highlights the disregard for the hurt felt by our ancestors and their descendants at the hands of the British. Your statement ignores the many billions of pounds (£) earned by British traders/traffickers who relied on the forced labour of African prisoners. This country’s wealth was built on that labour. “

Arthur Torrington


Free Access

The website requires users to register with its American parent company that owns the data but after that access is free.

The direct link to the 'Slave Registers of former British Colonial Dependencies, 1812-1834' database is;

http://content.ancestry.co.uk/iexec/?htx=List&dbid=1129&offerid=0%3a78


External Links
Ancestry Website
Free Access Petition


Ligali is not responsible for the content of third party sites



Speak Out!

How important is it that African people use all tools necessary to reclaim their history and original identity?
Click here to speak out and share your perspective on this article.
Free online access may be regarded as a form of reparation for the cruelty and injustice by the British in the era of African enslavement.

Equiano Society: Arthur Torrington

See Related:




Get involved and help change our world